Aldo Rainoldi Rosso Di Valtellina  2012 750ml
SKU 756188

Aldo Rainoldi Rosso Di Valtellina 2012

Aldo Rainoldi - Lombardy - Italy - Valtellina
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750ml

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Winery: Aldo Rainoldi

Vintage: 2012

2012 has, so far been a positive year for wineries around the world. While it may be a little too early to speak of the wines being made in the northern hemisphere, European and North American wineries have already begun reporting that their harvesting season has been generally very good, and are predicting to continue with the kind of successes they saw in 2011. However, 2012 has been something of a late year for France, due to unpredictable weather throughout the summer, and the grapes were ripening considerably later than they did in 2011 (which was, admittedly, an exceptionally early year). French wineries are claiming, though, that this could well turn out to be advantageous, as the slow ripening will allow the resulting wines to express more flavour and features of the terroir they are grown in. The southern hemisphere has seen ideal climatic conditions in most of the key wine producing countries, and Australia and New Zealand particularly had a superb year, in particular with the Bordeaux varietal grapes that grow there and which love the humidity these countries received plenty of. Also enjoying a fantastic year for weather were wineries across Argentina and Chile, with the Mendoza region claiming that 2012 will be one of their best vintages of the past decade. Similar claims are being made across the Chilean wine regions, where Sauvignon Blanc and Cabernet Sauvignon had an especially good year. These two grape varietals also produced characterful wines on the coastal regions of South Africa this year.

Varietal: Nebbiolo

The name 'Nebbiolo' means 'fog' in Italian, and there is some debate as to the origin of this unusual name. However, many people claim it has something to do with the milky white dust which covers these dark, round grapes as they begin to reach maturity. The Nebbiolo grapes are most renowned for their inclusion in the finest wines of Italy, where they are allowed to age and mellow their strong tannins, producing wonderfully complex wines packed with dense, interesting flavors Most commonly, Nebbiolo wines hold beautiful tones of truffle, violet and prunes, and are highly aromatic and mellow on the palate. Their popularity and fame has helped them become established in several New World countries, where they continue to seduce and fascinate wine drinkers looking for an elegant, sophisticated wine which packs in plenty of wonderful flavors

Region: Lombardy

The north westerly region of Lombardy in Italy has long been recognized as a highly important center for viticulture, and despite the region being dominated by industry and huge cities such as Milan, it also has mile upon mile of beautiful, unspoilt green space ideal for growing vines. For centuries, the shores of the stunning and expansive Lake Garda have been home to many of Italy's finest vineyards, where the temperature is cooler and more suitable for slowly ripening grapes of exceedingly high quality. Today, Lombardy primarily produces superbly crisp and flavorful white wines made from the Trebbiano varietal grape. However, recent decades have seen much successful experimentation with Bordeaux varietals such as Merlot, Cabernet Sauvignon and Pinot Noir, making this a thoroughly modern wine region, albeit one steeped in history and tradition.

Country: Italy

It isn't difficult to understand why Italy is famed not just for the quality of its wines, but also for the vast variety and range of characteristics found in the wines there. The terrain of the country varies wildly, from the lush rolling green hills and valley of Tuscany, to the sun drenched rocky coasts of Sicily, the mountainous and alpine regions of the north, and the marshy lowlands of the east. Italy really does have a little bit of everything. Combine this huge range of landscapes with an almost perfect climate for grape cultivation, and you have a country seemingly designed for viticultural excellence. The results speak for themselves, and it is clear to see that wine has become an inseparable part of Italian culture as a result of its abundance and brilliance. Each village, city and region has a local wine perfectly matched with the cuisine of the area, and not an evening passes without the vast majority of Italian families raising a glass of locally sourced wine with pride and pleasure.