Alpha Estate Xinomavro Reserve Old Vines  2009 750ml
SKU 742467

Alpha Estate Xinomavro Reserve Old Vines 2009

Alpha Estate - Amyndeon - Greece

Professional Wine Reviews for Alpha Estate Xinomavro Reserve Old Vines 2009

Rated 90 by Robert Parker
The 2009 Xinomavro Reserve Vielles Vines is a special high-altitude (620-710 meters) and old-vines (88 years) bottling. It is typically one of the winery’s claims to fame. In this vintage it spent 24 months in new French oak rather than 18, though, said winemaker Angelos Iatridis, light to medium toast. It shows at the moment and it really doesn’t help. With some oaky background, it has a certain high-toned feel and the wine has an odd dimension to it as it loses its earthy purity. I think I actually preferred the Hedgehog this year – at least now. To be sure, this is a wine with a future, which gives it a chance to absorb...
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750ml
90Robert Parker

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Additional Information on Alpha Estate Xinomavro Reserve Old Vines 2009

Winery: Alpha Estate

Vintage: 2009

Despite less than ideal climatic conditions, featuring storms which threatened an otherwise perfect year, most parts of California had an excellent year for viticulture. Chardonnays and Sauvignon Blancs were picked at optimum ripeness, and Californian white wine was just about as good as it could be. Surprises and overcoming difficulties summed up much of the United States' wine industry in 2009, and many of the results from Oregon, Washington State and all over California speak for themselves, with the flagship Cabernet Sauvignon grapes having developed healthy, thick skins and thus plenty of character and distinction. Elsewhere in the New World, South Africa had a very good year in 2009, and wineries across the cape of the African continent are proclaiming it a truly great vintage. In most of Europe, fine weather and punctual ripening periods produced some excellent wines, with many of the best coming out of France's Bordeaux and the surrounding regions. Merlot had an exceptionally good year in France, and wineries are proclaiming that the 2009 Merlot harvest was one of the best in living memory. Indeed, across most of France, ripening was relatively even, and red wine grapes such as Cabernet Franc, Syrah and others were reportedly highly characterful, with plenty of the required tannin levels with which to make high quality wines. Italy, too, had a very good 2009. Piedmont reported extremely favorable conditions throughout 2009, and their signature Nebbiolo grapes were more or less perfect when harvested, having benefited from the slight drop in temperature at the end of their ripening period. Veneto, too, had an enviable year, producing superb Pinot Grigio and Chardonnay wines in 2009.

Varietal: Xinomavro

In Macedonia and other parts of southern Europe, the main red wine grape varietal grown is the Xinomavro, a blue-black skinned grape whose name translates as 'acid black'. This grape thrives in the hot and arid landscapes of parts of Greece and the Mediterranean coast, and has been used for centuries for the production of superbly characterful dark red wines. The main features of the Xinomavro grape include their thick skins, which hold a high tannin content, and the fact that they contain a relatively high amount of acidity. These features are often problematic in young wines made from Xinomavro grapes, but also produce exquisite aged wines, when the tannins and acids have been given time to mellow and round out. In aged Xinomavro wines, a wide bouquet of delightful aromas is often present, containing classic Mediterranean notes such as black olive and dried tomato.

Country: Greece

It is almost impossible to understate the importance of local and regionally produced wines in Greek culture. Across the country, from the cities of the mainland to the villages, mountainous regions and islands, wine is produced using traditional methods and native grape varietals, and is drank in households and taverns, either accompanying the much loved local cuisine or alone as a refreshment under the blazing Mediterranean sunshine. For wine lovers around the world, Greece is known for producing several wines with something unique and interesting to offer, a refreshing change from the norm filled with surprises and complex, occasionally challenging or unusual flavors and aromas. Thanks to the vast range in terrain across the archipelago, Greek wine is as varied as it is delicious, meaning there is plenty to explore and enjoy from this fascinating and ancient country.