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Amalie Robert Pinot Noir Dijon Clones 2008 750ml
SKU 772629

Amalie Robert Pinot Noir Dijon Clones 2008

Amalie Robert - Oregon - United States - Willamette Valley

Professional Wine Reviews for Amalie Robert Pinot Noir Dijon Clones 2008

Rated 92 by Stephen Tanzer
Light, bright red. Seductively perfumed, expressive aromas of dried red berries, allspice and cinnamon, with a slow-mounting floral quality and a hint of blood orange. Light in body but potent, offering sweet redcurrant and raspberry flavors that stain the palate. An intense spicy overtone carries through the nervy, mineral-driven finish. Lots of flavor intensity here but there's zero fat on this wine.
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Additional Information on Amalie Robert Pinot Noir Dijon Clones 2008

Winery: Amalie Robert

Vintage: 2008

2008 saw very high yields across wineries in much of the southern hemisphere, as a result of highly favorable climatic conditions. Although in many areas, these high yields brought with them something of a drop in overall quality, this could not be said for South Australia's wines, which were reportedly excellent. Indeed, the 2008 Shiraz harvest in South Australia is said to be one of the most successful in recent decades, and western Australia's Chardonnays are set to be ones to watch out for. New Zealand's Pinot Noir harvest was also very good, with wineries in Martinborough reportedly very excited about this particular grape and the characteristics it revealed this year. Pinot Noir also grew very well in the United States, and was probably the most successful grape varietal to come out of California in 2008, with Sonoma Coast and Anderson Valley delivering fantastic results from this grape. Elsewhere in United States, Washington State and Oregon had highly successful harvests in 2008 despite some early worries about frost. However, it was France who had the best of the weather and growing conditions in 2008, and this year was one of the great vintages for Champagne, the Médoc in Bordeaux, Languedoc-Roussillon and Provence, with Pinot Noir, Cabernet Sauvignon and Chardonnay grapes leading the way. Italy, too, shared many of these ideal conditions, with the wineries in Tuscany claiming that their Chianti Classicos of 2008 will be ones to collect, and Piedmont's Barberesco and Barolo wines will be recognized as amongst the finest of the past decade.

Varietal: Pinot Noir

Pinot Noir is one of the planet's most widely grown and enjoyed grape varietals, and thanks to the popularity of the key wines it is associated with – Burgundy and Champagne – it has successfully spread from its native home in France to much of the wine producing world. Pinot Noir means 'black pine' in French, and this refers to the extremely dark, inky color of the fruit, and the fact that it grows in conical bunches, resembling a large pine cone. It has long been revered for its wide range of refreshing, summery flavors, and the fact that it produces red wines of a beautiful garnet color and light body. More recently, sparkling wines made exclusively with Pinot Noir have been extremely popular, and the orchard notes found in the fizzy 'blanc des noirs' wines mark out just how versatile this grape varietal really is. Despite being notoriously difficult to grow, it isn't hard to see why this grape is now found in vineyards all over the world, as it is synonymous with romance and decadence, quality and fantastic flavor

Region: Oregon

Oregon today has a thriving and unique wine industry, quite unlike that found in other areas of the United States. With a particularly strong organic, vegan and biodynamic wine industry currently gaining world wide attention, Oregon is home to many trailblazers and alternative wineries keen to experiment with the vines which thrive so well in the valleys and mountainsides which characterise their region. Oregon is best known for their Pinot Gris and Pinot Noir varietal grapes, which produce elegant wines packed full of bright and interesting fruit flavours, although a wide range of classic grape varietals grow across the state. With over three hundred wineries currently operating in Oregon, and many more set to open, this is a New World wine region to watch out for now and in the near future.

Country: United States

Of all the New World wine countries, perhaps the one which has demonstrated the most flair for producing high quality wines - using a combination of traditional and forward-thinking contemporary methods - has been the United States of America. For the past couple of centuries, the United States has set about transforming much of its suitable land into vast vineyards, capable of supporting a wide variety of world-class grape varietals which thrive on both the Atlantic and the Pacific coastlines. Of course, we immediately think of sun-drenched California in regards to American wines, with its enormous vineyards responsible for the New World's finest examples of Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot based wines, but many other states have taken to viticulture in a big way, with impressive results. Oregon, Washington State and New York have all developed sophisticated and technologically advanced wine cultures of their own, and the output of U.S wineries is increasing each year as more and more people are converted to their produce.

Appellation: Willamette Valley

The beautiful state of Oregon is home to many productive and important wine producing regions, and one of the most important and widely renowned is Willamette Valley, a lush and fertile region internationally famed for its high quality, flavorful and characterful Pinot Noir wines. Willamette Valley is an ideal location for the Pinot Noir grape, as the long, hot summers and balmy ripening seasons allow the grapes to reach full ripeness, and express their deliciously luxurious flavors and aromas. However, plenty of other grape varietals also thrive in Willamette Valley, and the region is renowned for its dedication to quality, experimentation and innovation, with many wineries increasingly keen to expand their portfolios and show the world just how good and varied the Oregon wine scene can be.