Angulo Innocenti Malbec  2012 750ml
SKU 753822

Angulo Innocenti Malbec 2012

Angulo Innocenti - Cuyo - Argentina - Mendoza

Professional Wine Reviews for Angulo Innocenti Malbec 2012

Rated 91 by Robert Parker
The opaque purple-colored 2012 Malbec is a big (14.5% natural alcohol), 1,800-case cuvee that spent time in both neutral tanks (50%) and oak (50%). It reveals some spicy oak notes along with a big, sweet kiss of blackberry and black raspberry fruit as well as hints of camphor and white flowers. The complex aromatics are followed by a medium to full-bodied, lush, opulent Malbec to enjoy over the next 4-5 years, perhaps longer.
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750ml
91Robert Parker

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Additional Information on Angulo Innocenti Malbec 2012

Vintage: 2012

2012 has, so far been a positive year for wineries around the world. While it may be a little too early to speak of the wines being made in the northern hemisphere, European and North American wineries have already begun reporting that their harvesting season has been generally very good, and are predicting to continue with the kind of successes they saw in 2011. However, 2012 has been something of a late year for France, due to unpredictable weather throughout the summer, and the grapes were ripening considerably later than they did in 2011 (which was, admittedly, an exceptionally early year). French wineries are claiming, though, that this could well turn out to be advantageous, as the slow ripening will allow the resulting wines to express more flavour and features of the terroir they are grown in. The southern hemisphere has seen ideal climatic conditions in most of the key wine producing countries, and Australia and New Zealand particularly had a superb year, in particular with the Bordeaux varietal grapes that grow there and which love the humidity these countries received plenty of. Also enjoying a fantastic year for weather were wineries across Argentina and Chile, with the Mendoza region claiming that 2012 will be one of their best vintages of the past decade. Similar claims are being made across the Chilean wine regions, where Sauvignon Blanc and Cabernet Sauvignon had an especially good year. These two grape varietals also produced characterful wines on the coastal regions of South Africa this year.

Varietal: Malbec

The heavy purple bunches of Malbec grapes found growing in many New and Old World countries produce some extremely varied and distinctive wines. Their thick skins have a high tannin content, which means the wines produced from them are generally full-bodied and deep red in color. Single variety Malbec wines tend to be extremely plummy in their flavor, packing a strong punch and making them ideal for matching with spicy foods. However, because of their high malic acid content and their powerful tannins, many wineries use these grapes for blending with more mellow varietals, producing wonderfully complex wines which age beautifully and produce remarkable flavors and aromas. Because of this, Malbec holds the high position of being one of the few grape varietals used in the production of Bordeaux wines, widely recognized as being the finest wines on earth.

Region: Cuyo

The historic mountainous region of Cuyo in central-west Argentina, remains the nation's key wine producing area to this day, producing over eighty percent of the country's wines. Argentinian wines have gone from strength to strength over the past few decades, and it is undoubtedly the region of Cuyo which produces Argentina's most characterful and representative wines. Cuyo's dry and arid soil, rich in iron and other minerals has proven to be an ideal environment for the cultivation of Malbec grapes, alongside several other varietals which thrive in the hot climate and reach full ripeness each autumn, expressing their fruit-forward character. The vineyards of Cuyo are fed by the great Desaguadero River and its tributaries, helped by the extensive irrigation projects which have been undertaken over the past century.

Country: Argentina

It is said that the first Argentinian vines were planted in the Mendoza more than four hundred years ago by European settlers, and despite these early wines being used primarily for religious purposes, the fervor for wine making never left the area. Today, Argentina is keen to demonstrate its technological prowess when it comes to vineyard cultivation, by combining traditional methods of irrigation left over from the Huarpes Indians with modern techniques in order to make the dry, arid desert an ideal environment for growing grapes. Indeed, these ancient irrigation channels, dug hundreds of years ago and still in use today, bring mineral-rich melt water from the Andes via the Mendoza river, something which gives the grapes grown in this region some of their character. The primary grape of this and other regions of Argentina is the Malbec, which is highly susceptible to rot in its native France, but which thrives in the dry and hot climate of South America, producing rich and plummy wines which are highly drinkable especially when young.