SKU 728831

Castello Di Semivicoli Trebbiano D'abruzzo 2008

Castello Di Semivicoli - Abruzzi - Italy - Trebbiano D`abruzzo

Professional Wine Reviews for Castello Di Semivicoli Trebbiano D'abruzzo 2008

Rated 92 by Robert Parker
An eye-opening wine, the 2008 Trebbiano d'Abruzzo Castello di Semivicoli still has wonderful freshness and plenty of intrigue at an age where most whites start to fall apart. Peach, apricot and white floral notes are supported by clean veins of minerality in a bright, beautifully delineated Trebbiano that will continue to drink well for at least a handful of years. Anticipated maturity: 2013-2015.
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92 Robert Parker

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Additional Information on Castello Di Semivicoli Trebbiano D'abruzzo 2008

Winery: Castello Di Semivicoli

Vintage: 2008

2008 saw very high yields across wineries in much of the southern hemisphere, as a result of highly favorable climatic conditions. Although in many areas, these high yields brought with them something of a drop in overall quality, this could not be said for South Australia's wines, which were reportedly excellent. Indeed, the 2008 Shiraz harvest in South Australia is said to be one of the most successful in recent decades, and western Australia's Chardonnays are set to be ones to watch out for. New Zealand's Pinot Noir harvest was also very good, with wineries in Martinborough reportedly very excited about this particular grape and the characteristics it revealed this year. Pinot Noir also grew very well in the United States, and was probably the most successful grape varietal to come out of California in 2008, with Sonoma Coast and Anderson Valley delivering fantastic results from this grape. Elsewhere in United States, Washington State and Oregon had highly successful harvests in 2008 despite some early worries about frost. However, it was France who had the best of the weather and growing conditions in 2008, and this year was one of the great vintages for Champagne, the Médoc in Bordeaux, Languedoc-Roussillon and Provence, with Pinot Noir, Cabernet Sauvignon and Chardonnay grapes leading the way. Italy, too, shared many of these ideal conditions, with the wineries in Tuscany claiming that their Chianti Classicos of 2008 will be ones to collect, and Piedmont's Barberesco and Barolo wines will be recognized as amongst the finest of the past decade.

Varietal: Trebbiano

Trebbiano grapes have been used for wine production for at least a thousand years in their native home of Italy. It is known that they were introduced to France in the fourteenth century, where they became wildly popular all throughout the country in medieval times. Today, cultivation of Trebbiano grapes is smaller, and they are primarily used for making fortified wines and as a blending grape due to their high acidity and aromatic qualities. However, in Tuscany and elsewhere in the world, wineries are making extremely high quality single variety white wines with the Trebbiano grape, and making the most of its delightful acidity and excellent citrus fruit flavors Trebbiano is also prized by wine makers due to the fact that it is very good at expressing the terroir it is grown in, often resulting in surprising and complex wines.

Country: Italy

It isn't difficult to understand why Italy is famed not just for the quality of its wines, but also for the vast variety and range of characteristics found in the wines there. The terrain of the country varies wildly, from the lush rolling green hills and valley of Tuscany, to the sun drenched rocky coasts of Sicily, the mountainous and alpine regions of the north, and the marshy lowlands of the east. Italy really does have a little bit of everything. Combine this huge range of landscapes with an almost perfect climate for grape cultivation, and you have a country seemingly designed for viticultural excellence. The results speak for themselves, and it is clear to see that wine has become an inseparable part of Italian culture as a result of its abundance and brilliance. Each village, city and region has a local wine perfectly matched with the cuisine of the area, and not an evening passes without the vast majority of Italian families raising a glass of locally sourced wine with pride and pleasure.