SKU 740667

Ciacci Piccolomini D'aragona Brunello Di Montalcino Pianrosso 2008

Ciacci Piccolomini D'aragona - Tuscany - Italy - Brunello Di Montalcino

Professional Wine Reviews for Ciacci Piccolomini D'aragona Brunello Di Montalcino Pianrosso 2008

Rated 93 by Decanter
Aromas of dried cherries and plums with hints of flowers follow through to a full body with velvety tannins and a juicy, meaty, fruity aftertaste. Turns to chocolate powder as well. Drink or hold. (Suckling)
Rated 91 by Wine Spectator
Graphite and cedar aromas lead off in this cherry-, strawberry- and licorice-flavored red. This is firm, with quiet intensity and a dense, spice-infused finish. Best from 2015 through 2030
Rated 91 by Robert... read more... Additional information »
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93 Decanter
91 Wine Spectator
91 Robert Parker

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Additional Information on Ciacci Piccolomini D'aragona Brunello Di Montalcino Pianrosso 2008

Winery: Ciacci Piccolomini D'aragona

Vintage: 2008

2008 saw very high yields across wineries in much of the southern hemisphere, as a result of highly favorable climatic conditions. Although in many areas, these high yields brought with them something of a drop in overall quality, this could not be said for South Australia's wines, which were reportedly excellent. Indeed, the 2008 Shiraz harvest in South Australia is said to be one of the most successful in recent decades, and western Australia's Chardonnays are set to be ones to watch out for. New Zealand's Pinot Noir harvest was also very good, with wineries in Martinborough reportedly very excited about this particular grape and the characteristics it revealed this year. Pinot Noir also grew very well in the United States, and was probably the most successful grape varietal to come out of California in 2008, with Sonoma Coast and Anderson Valley delivering fantastic results from this grape. Elsewhere in United States, Washington State and Oregon had highly successful harvests in 2008 despite some early worries about frost. However, it was France who had the best of the weather and growing conditions in 2008, and this year was one of the great vintages for Champagne, the Médoc in Bordeaux, Languedoc-Roussillon and Provence, with Pinot Noir, Cabernet Sauvignon and Chardonnay grapes leading the way. Italy, too, shared many of these ideal conditions, with the wineries in Tuscany claiming that their Chianti Classicos of 2008 will be ones to collect, and Piedmont's Barberesco and Barolo wines will be recognized as amongst the finest of the past decade.

Varietal: Sangiovese

Wines made with the round, darkly colored Sangiovese grape varietal tend to demonstrate the grape's key attributes: high acidity, moderate tannins and pale red color These grapes have been grown in their native Italy for thousands of years, and are said to be one of the key varietals which were so loved by the ancient Etruscan and Roman civilization Fast forward a few millennia, and all over the world, wineries are still growing these grapes in order to capture that renowned and flavorful essence. What makes Sangiovese so loved by drinkers and vintners alike is its wonderful ability to soak up the earthy, woody flavors of the oak barrels they are aged in, and present these in the glass alongside fresh, bright summer fruit notes. Whilst Sangiovese grapes are often blended during the fermentation process, they are also drank as single variety wines, both young and fresh, and aged and complex.

Region: Tuscany

The central Italian region of Tuscany is widely understood to be one of the world's most famous and highly regarded wine regions. The beautiful rolling hillsides and medieval towns and castles which are a key feature of the area are also home to many of Europe's finest wineries, and extremely high quality vineyards growing the distinctive Sangiovese and Vernaccia grape varietals which are the flavorful backbone of Tuscany's wonderful red and white wines. For almost three thousand years, this region has been recognized as an ideal home for wine production on a large scale, and the ancient Etruscans, Greeks and Romans all noticed that fine grape varietals flourished on the unique soils and under the hot sunshine which typifies the area. Today, Tuscany is home to a wide range of wines, from the traditional to the complex, but all dedicated to excellent flavors and aromas, and maintaining the region's international reputation.

Country: Italy

There are few countries in the world with a viticultural history as long or as illustrious as that claimed by Italy. Grapes were first being grown and cultivated on Italian soil several thousand years ago by the Greeks and the Pheonicians, who named Italy 'Oenotria' – the land of wines – so impressed were they with the climate and the suitability of the soil for wine production. Of course, it was the rise of the Roman Empire which had the most lasting influence on wine production in Italy, and their influence can still be felt today, as much of the riches of the empire came about through their enthusiasm for producing wines and exporting it to neighbouring countries. Since those times, a vast amount of Italian land has remained primarily for vine cultivation, and thousands of wineries can be found throughout the entire length and breadth of this beautiful country, drenched in Mediterranean sunshine and benefiting from the excellent fertile soils found there. Italy remains very much a 'land of wines', and one could not imagine this country, its landscape and culture, without it.