Croft Porto Vintage  2011 750ml
SKU 749666

Croft Porto Vintage 2011

Croft - Porto - Portugal

Professional Wine Reviews for Croft Porto Vintage 2011

Rated 97 by Wine Spectator
Effusively juicy, rich and concentrated, showing plenty of snap to the crisp and well-spiced flavors of wild berry, dark currant and plum tart. Orange-infused chocolate notes linger on the exotic, mocha-filled finish. Best from 2020 through 2045. 5,000 cases made. #13 Top100, 2013
Rated 95 by Robert Parker
The 2011 Croft is initially taciturn on the nose, even after allowing it 20 minutes in my glass. A light swirling immediately awakens the aromatics to offer blackberry, Seville orange marmalade, blueberries and dried fig – complex and quite compelling. There is real...
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750ml
97Wine Spectator
95Robert Parker
95Beverage Tasting Institute

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Additional Information on Croft Porto Vintage 2011

Winery: Croft

Vintage: 2011

The year 2011 was an interesting year for many northern and central European countries, as the weather was more than unpredictable in the spring and summer. However, in most countries, the climatic conditions thankfully settled down in the late summer and fall. The result of this slightly difficult year of weather in France was a set of surprisingly small yields, but overall, these yields were of a higher quality than those harvested in certain previous years. A fantastic set of wines was also made in Italy and Spain, and the Rioja wines - when released - are set to be very good indeed. Austria also had superb year in 2011, with almost fifty percent more grapes being grown and used for their distinctive Gruner Veltliner wines than in the year before. Possibly the European country which had the finest 2011, though, was Portugal, with wineries in the Douro region claiming this year to be one of the best in decades for the production of Port wine, and the bright, young Vinho Verdes wines. In the New World, the Pacific Northwest saw some of the best weather of 2011, and Washington State and Oregon reportedly had a highly successful year, especially for the cultivation of high quality red wine grapes. Chile and Argentina had a relatively cool year, which certainly helped retain the character of many of their key grape varietals, and should make for some exciting drinking. South Africa had especially good weather for their white wine grape varietals, particularly Chardonnay and Sauvignon Blanc, and many South African wineries are reporting 2011 as one of their best years in recent memory.

Region: Porto

The magnificent city of Porto - the capital of Portugal - is located near the mouth of the beautiful Douro river, in the beating heart of the Douro wine region. The Douro region has been regarded as one of the most important viticultural region of Europe for several centuries, and was the third region to be officially recognized and protected as a wine region, with laws having been passed in the mid 18th century regarding its status. Porto is, of course, most famous for the production of Port wine, an aromatic and slightly viscous tawny colored fortified wine, with a fascinating history of seafaring, experimentation and innovation. The vineyards used in the region for the production of Porto's wines contain up to a hundred different grape varietals, resulting in the wide range of Port wines on offer today.

Country: Portugal

Most of us are quick to associate Portugal primarily with the excellent fortified wines which come out of the Porto area, but there is much more to Portuguese viticulture than just this. Perhaps the most popular still wines the country produces are the varieties from the Vinho Verde region, which uses grapes that do not achieve high doses of sugar, meaning the wines are at their best when young and full of natural, springy fruit flavors The wines of the Douro region have undergone many transformations in their flavor and character over the centuries; once regarded as a bitter wine, the exporters experimented with fortifying the wine with brandy. After several centuries, vintners found a balance in the modern age which is at once reminiscent of Port wine, yet with the structure and character closer to other fine Portuguese wines. Thanks to the appellation system of Portugal and the strict laws governing wine production, Portuguese wines continue to maintain their reputation for quality and the distinctive characteristics they carry.