Domaine Ostertag Pinot Gris Barriques  2011 750ml
SKU 744503

Domaine Ostertag Pinot Gris Barriques 2011

Domaine Ostertag - Alsace - France

Professional Wine Reviews for Domaine Ostertag Pinot Gris Barriques 2011

Rated 90 by Robert Parker
The Ostertag 2011 Pinot Gris Barriques displays richly ripe, juicy peach and pineapple allied to structure and phenolic cut that are more than able to stand-up to the influence of its (only around 10% new) oak. Lanolin, resin and vanilla mingle with grape-borne brown spices, caraway and peach kernel. Silken and glycerol-rich, this at once soothes and stimulates in a protracted and flatteringly buoyant finish. I imagine it serving well through 2018. “Pinot Gris is the most fragile grape in Alsace,” opines Ostertag, who considers the fungal characteristics that generally prevail with it to be manifestations of low-level botrytis...
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$30.84
12 Bottle
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750ml
90Robert Parker

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Additional Information on Domaine Ostertag Pinot Gris Barriques 2011

Vintage: 2011

The year 2011 was an interesting year for many northern and central European countries, as the weather was more than unpredictable in the spring and summer. However, in most countries, the climatic conditions thankfully settled down in the late summer and fall. The result of this slightly difficult year of weather in France was a set of surprisingly small yields, but overall, these yields were of a higher quality than those harvested in certain previous years. A fantastic set of wines was also made in Italy and Spain, and the Rioja wines - when released - are set to be very good indeed. Austria also had superb year in 2011, with almost fifty percent more grapes being grown and used for their distinctive Gruner Veltliner wines than in the year before. Possibly the European country which had the finest 2011, though, was Portugal, with wineries in the Douro region claiming this year to be one of the best in decades for the production of Port wine, and the bright, young Vinho Verdes wines. In the New World, the Pacific Northwest saw some of the best weather of 2011, and Washington State and Oregon reportedly had a highly successful year, especially for the cultivation of high quality red wine grapes. Chile and Argentina had a relatively cool year, which certainly helped retain the character of many of their key grape varietals, and should make for some exciting drinking. South Africa had especially good weather for their white wine grape varietals, particularly Chardonnay and Sauvignon Blanc, and many South African wineries are reporting 2011 as one of their best years in recent memory.

Varietal: Pinot Gris

Pinot Grigio is fast becoming one of the most widely planted white wine grape varietals in the world, due to the fact that the wines made from it are increasing in popularity with global audiences, and the fact it has the ability to match with a wide variety of different foods. This grape varietal is notably for its color, or colors, which range from grayish blue to amber, from pink to purple depending on the climatic conditions and other such variables in the place where they are grown. Pinot Grigio grapes tend to ripen early, yet have a relatively high natural sugar content. This makes them ideal for a wide range of winery methods, and they can either be drank young and slightly sweet, or can be fermented more for extra dryness or a higher alcohol level.

Region: Alsace

Step into any good wine store, and you'll easily be able to recognize the Alsatian wines, due to their slender, Germanic bottles which contain wines made from one or more of the grapes native to the region. The wines of Alsace are well known around the world, and for centuries they have been renowned for their quality and fascinating features. The grapes allowed to be used in Alsace wines are carefully overseen by the French government, and only nine different fine varietals are permitted to be grown within the vineyards of Alsace. Most commonly, wineries process Pinot Noir and Riesling varietal grapes for their wines, although it is also common to see a blend of other Germanic and French native grapes listed on the bottles.

Country: France

French winemakers are subjected to several laws and regulations regarding the wines they produce, and how they can be labeled and sold. Such procedures are designed to increase the overall quality of the country's produce, and also to ensure that wines made in each particular region or appellation are of a character and type which is representative of the area. Thankfully for consumers of wine world-wide, the French have a particularly high reputation to uphold, and seem to do so flawlessly. Every year, wineries from all over France produce millions upon millions of bottles of fine wine, making the most of their native grape varieties and the excellent terrain which covers most of the country. From the expensive and exquisite red wines of Bordeaux and Burgundy, to the white wines and cremants of central France, the French are dedicated to providing the world with wines of the highest quality and most distinctive character.