El Enemigo Gran Enemigo  2008 750ml
SKU 741405

El Enemigo Gran Enemigo 2008

El Enemigo - Cuyo - Argentina - Mendoza - Uco Valley

Professional Wine Reviews for El Enemigo Gran Enemigo 2008

Rated 94 by Robert Parker
The 2008 El Gran Enemigo Malbec contains small quantities of Cabernet Franc and Petit Verdot in its blend. It has a dense purple color and an alluring nose of sandalwood, exotic spices, incense, lavender, a hint of balsamic, and black cherry. Ripe, sweetly-fruited, and voluptuous, this layered, spicy offering mandates 3-4 years of cellaring and will deliver prime drinking from 2014 to 2023+.
Rated 92 by Stephen Tanzer
(80% cabernet franc from 80-year-old vines with 10% each malbec and petit verdot): Good ruby-red. Perfumed, exotic aromas of black cherry, violet, spices,...
Read More... Additional information »
 
$72.84
Bottle
$72.04
12 Bottle
(case price $864.48)
Check Availability 
Add 12 more to get fixed rate shipping

750ml
94Robert Parker
92Stephen Tanzer
91Wine Spectator

More wines available from El Enemigo Winery

El Enemigo Gran Enemigo 2008 Customer Reviews

Customer Also Bought

Additional Information on El Enemigo Gran Enemigo 2008

Winery: El Enemigo

Vintage: 2008

2008 saw very high yields across wineries in much of the southern hemisphere, as a result of highly favorable climatic conditions. Although in many areas, these high yields brought with them something of a drop in overall quality, this could not be said for South Australia's wines, which were reportedly excellent. Indeed, the 2008 Shiraz harvest in South Australia is said to be one of the most successful in recent decades, and western Australia's Chardonnays are set to be ones to watch out for. New Zealand's Pinot Noir harvest was also very good, with wineries in Martinborough reportedly very excited about this particular grape and the characteristics it revealed this year. Pinot Noir also grew very well in the United States, and was probably the most successful grape varietal to come out of California in 2008, with Sonoma Coast and Anderson Valley delivering fantastic results from this grape. Elsewhere in United States, Washington State and Oregon had highly successful harvests in 2008 despite some early worries about frost. However, it was France who had the best of the weather and growing conditions in 2008, and this year was one of the great vintages for Champagne, the Médoc in Bordeaux, Languedoc-Roussillon and Provence, with Pinot Noir, Cabernet Sauvignon and Chardonnay grapes leading the way. Italy, too, shared many of these ideal conditions, with the wineries in Tuscany claiming that their Chianti Classicos of 2008 will be ones to collect, and Piedmont's Barberesco and Barolo wines will be recognized as amongst the finest of the past decade.

Region: Cuyo

Undoubtedly the most important viticultural region of the country of Argentina is Cuyo, the arid and red-soiled area within central-west Argentina which produces over eighty percent of the nation's wine each year. Cuyo represents the finest aspects of Argentinian wine making, with wineries in the region celebrating their traditions which stretch back to the sacramental wines first introduced to the country by Spanish settlers hundreds of years ago. As with much of Argentina, Cuyo is most famous for the production of Malbec wines, with Malbec grapes thriving prodigiously in the hot climate of the region, reaching full ripeness in ways they rarely could in their native France, and producing wines of exceptional flavor and quality. The Desaguadero River is the key water source in this otherwise dry and dusty region, and successful irrigation projects have helped bring water to even the driest vineyards within Cuyo.

Country: Argentina

Anyone who has been the Mendoza area of Argentina may be surprised to find that this is one of the primary wine regions of the country, now comfortably sitting as the fifth largest producer of wine in the world. The Mendoza is an incredibly dry and arid desert, which receives as little as two hundred millimeters of rainfall per year, and supports very little life at all. We can thank the ancient technologies of the Huarpes Indians for Argentina's current booming wine trade, as they managed to irrigate the region by digging channels from the Mendoza river, thus creating an area which had enough access to water with which to grow vines. Not only this, but the grape which Argentina primarily uses for their wines – Malbec – actually flourishes in such conditions, as it is less likely to suffer from the rot it so often finds in the considerably damper regions of Europe it has its origins in. Such expertise and foresight has resulted in Argentina being able to produce high quality wines of both red and white types, with Malbec, Bonarda and Cabernet Sauvignon dominating the vineyards for red wines, and Torrontés, Chardonnay and Chenin Blanc making up for most of the white wine produced there.