Evesham Wood Pinot Noir Le Puits Sec  2011 750ml
SKU 748650

Evesham Wood Pinot Noir Le Puits Sec 2011

Evesham Wood - Oregon - United States - Willamette Valley

Professional Wine Reviews for Evesham Wood Pinot Noir Le Puits Sec 2011

Rated 91 by Robert Parker
Cinnamon and fresh ginger, sassafras, lemon oil and smoky black tea pungently and invigoratingly accent cherry in the nose infectiously juicy palate of Evesham Wood’s 2011 Pinot Noir Le Puits Sec, which as usual incorporates most of the estate’s Pommard vines. There is textural polish here that was missing from this year’s two less-expensive Pinot bottlings, and a vibrant ping and ringing persistence of fruit and spice, with dark shadings of burley tobacco and humus adding further to the complexity adumbrated on the nose. Look for delicious versatility and continued vivacity from this fine value through at least 2020.
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12 Bottle
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750ml
91Robert Parker

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Additional Information on Evesham Wood Pinot Noir Le Puits Sec 2011

Winery: Evesham Wood

Vintage: 2011

The year 2011 was an interesting year for many northern and central European countries, as the weather was more than unpredictable in the spring and summer. However, in most countries, the climatic conditions thankfully settled down in the late summer and fall. The result of this slightly difficult year of weather in France was a set of surprisingly small yields, but overall, these yields were of a higher quality than those harvested in certain previous years. A fantastic set of wines was also made in Italy and Spain, and the Rioja wines - when released - are set to be very good indeed. Austria also had superb year in 2011, with almost fifty percent more grapes being grown and used for their distinctive Gruner Veltliner wines than in the year before. Possibly the European country which had the finest 2011, though, was Portugal, with wineries in the Douro region claiming this year to be one of the best in decades for the production of Port wine, and the bright, young Vinho Verdes wines. In the New World, the Pacific Northwest saw some of the best weather of 2011, and Washington State and Oregon reportedly had a highly successful year, especially for the cultivation of high quality red wine grapes. Chile and Argentina had a relatively cool year, which certainly helped retain the character of many of their key grape varietals, and should make for some exciting drinking. South Africa had especially good weather for their white wine grape varietals, particularly Chardonnay and Sauvignon Blanc, and many South African wineries are reporting 2011 as one of their best years in recent memory.

Varietal: Pinot Noir

Pinot Noir is one of the planet's most widely grown and enjoyed grape varietals, and thanks to the popularity of the key wines it is associated with – Burgundy and Champagne – it has successfully spread from its native home in France to much of the wine producing world. Pinot Noir means 'black pine' in French, and this refers to the extremely dark, inky color of the fruit, and the fact that it grows in conical bunches, resembling a large pine cone. It has long been revered for its wide range of refreshing, summery flavors, and the fact that it produces red wines of a beautiful garnet color and light body. More recently, sparkling wines made exclusively with Pinot Noir have been extremely popular, and the orchard notes found in the fizzy 'blanc des noirs' wines mark out just how versatile this grape varietal really is. Despite being notoriously difficult to grow, it isn't hard to see why this grape is now found in vineyards all over the world, as it is synonymous with romance and decadence, quality and fantastic flavor

Region: Oregon

The beautiful state of Oregon has, over the past few decades, become increasingly well known and respected for its wine industry, with several small but significant wineries within the state receiving world wide attention for the quality of their produce. Whilst the first vineyards within Oregon were planted in the 1840s, the state's wine industry didn't really take off until the 1960s, when several wine producers from California discovered that the cooler regions of the state were ideal for cultivating various fine grape varietals. Today, Oregon has over four hundred and fifty wineries in operation, the vast majority of which are used for the production of wines made from Pinot Gris and Pinot Noir varietal grapes, both of which thrive in the valleys and mountainsides which characterise the landscape of the state.

Country: United States

For three hundred years now, the United States has been leading the New World in wine production, both in regards to quantity and quality. Wine is actually produced in all fifty states across the country, with California leading the way by an enormous margin. Indeed, as much as eighty-nine percent of all wines to come out of the United States are produced in California, where the fertile soils and sloping mountain sides, coupled with the long, hot summers provide ideal conditions for producing high quality, European style red, white and rosé wines. With over a million acres of the country under vine, the United States sits comfortably as the fourth largest wine producer in the world, where imported grape varietals from all over the Old World are processed using a successful blend of traditional and contemporary techniques.

Appellation: Willamette Valley

Willamette Valley in Oregon may not be the most famous of the United States' wine regions, but it has a reputation for producing high quality wines which are the very essence of the land they are grown on, and it is consistently gaining international attention for its beautiful Pinot Noir wines. The wines of Willamette Valley are generally fruit-forward, elegant and lush, and full of the fine features of their terroir, making them a fascinating range of wines for lovers of New World produce. Whilst Pinot Noir is by far the most common grape grown in Willamette Valley, wineries of this region have a reputation for innovation and experimentation within viticultural circles, and are ever expanding their portfolios and experimenting with new varietals. As such, Willamette Valley is a highly interesting region to look into, with an impressive array of well crafted, delicious wines.