SKU 750296

Lingenfelder Gewurztraminer Hare Label 2012

Lingenfelder - Pfalz - Germany
12 Bottle
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Additional Information on Lingenfelder Gewurztraminer Hare Label 2012

Winery: Lingenfelder

Vintage: 2012

2012 has, so far been a positive year for wineries around the world. While it may be a little too early to speak of the wines being made in the northern hemisphere, European and North American wineries have already begun reporting that their harvesting season has been generally very good, and are predicting to continue with the kind of successes they saw in 2011. However, 2012 has been something of a late year for France, due to unpredictable weather throughout the summer, and the grapes were ripening considerably later than they did in 2011 (which was, admittedly, an exceptionally early year). French wineries are claiming, though, that this could well turn out to be advantageous, as the slow ripening will allow the resulting wines to express more flavour and features of the terroir they are grown in. The southern hemisphere has seen ideal climatic conditions in most of the key wine producing countries, and Australia and New Zealand particularly had a superb year, in particular with the Bordeaux varietal grapes that grow there and which love the humidity these countries received plenty of. Also enjoying a fantastic year for weather were wineries across Argentina and Chile, with the Mendoza region claiming that 2012 will be one of their best vintages of the past decade. Similar claims are being made across the Chilean wine regions, where Sauvignon Blanc and Cabernet Sauvignon had an especially good year. These two grape varietals also produced characterful wines on the coastal regions of South Africa this year.

Varietal: Gewurztraminer

The pink-purple grapes of the Gewurztraminer vines are renowned for being particularly difficult to grow, struggling in soils containing chalk and being extremely sensitive to fluctuating climatic conditions. Not only can they cannot survive frost, they also lose all of their interesting and unique flavors in too much heat. Despite this, wineries in their native central Europe, as well as elsewhere in the world continue to persevere with this varietal, and for very good reason. Few other grape varietals produce wines as aromatic or interestingly flavored as the Gewurztraminer, being packed full of beautiful perfumed notes reminiscent of lychees and rose water. Their natural sweetness comes through beautifully in the glass, and their bouquet is considered to be amongst the most pleasing and complex of any grape varietal.

Region: Pfalz

The beautiful, windswept valleys of Germany's Pfalz region has long been regarded as a flagship region for the country's wine culture, and today, hundreds of wineries have made this ancient region their home. With over twenty five thousand hectares of Pfalz under vine, it is the second largest wine producing region in the country, and yet the main focus of Pfalz wine is on quality over quantity, with careful attention paid to the flavors and aromas of the wines each winery produces. Traditional techniques remain strong, and the dozens of grape varietals which flourish in the relatively warm and dry climate of the region are used to create wines which are distinctly Germanic in style, with vintners keen to show off the finest features of their stunning terroir.

Country: Germany

If German wine has had something of a bad reputation in the past, it may well be the fault of the fact that for a long time now, the Germans have simply kept all the best produce to themselves. Visit any town or village in wine producing regions of Germany, and you'll be faced with a stunning array of extremely high quality wines, each matched with local dishes and full of distinct character and flavor. As white wine production makes up for about two-thirds of all Germany's wine industry, this is by far the most visible and widely enjoyed type of wine, but one should not overlook the quality and range of rosé and red wines on offer from this fascinating country. In particular, the Spatburgunder wines (the German name for Pinot Noir) are generally of an exceptionally high quality, being full of dark, intense hedgerow fruit flavors and exciting spicy notes with a silky smooth finish.