Luis Felipe Edwards Lfe 900 Blend  2008 750ml
SKU 735355

Luis Felipe Edwards Lfe 900 Blend 2008

Luis Felipe Edwards - Valle Central - Chile - Colchagua - Rapel

Professional Wine Reviews for Luis Felipe Edwards Lfe 900 Blend 2008

Rated 90 by Robert Parker
The 2008 LFE Blend is made up of 36% Petite Sirah, 30% Cabernet Sauvignon, 24% Syrah, 7% Carmenere, and 3% Malbec aged for 18 months in new French oak. It displays an already complex bouquet of toasty oak, mineral, spice box, lavender, and assorted black fruits. Dense, rich, and plush, it is a powerful, lengthy wine that will benefit from another 4-5 years of cellaring. It has a drinking window extending from 2016 to 2023, perhaps longer.
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750ml
90Robert Parker

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Additional Information on Luis Felipe Edwards Lfe 900 Blend 2008

Vintage: 2008

2008 saw very high yields across wineries in much of the southern hemisphere, as a result of highly favorable climatic conditions. Although in many areas, these high yields brought with them something of a drop in overall quality, this could not be said for South Australia's wines, which were reportedly excellent. Indeed, the 2008 Shiraz harvest in South Australia is said to be one of the most successful in recent decades, and western Australia's Chardonnays are set to be ones to watch out for. New Zealand's Pinot Noir harvest was also very good, with wineries in Martinborough reportedly very excited about this particular grape and the characteristics it revealed this year. Pinot Noir also grew very well in the United States, and was probably the most successful grape varietal to come out of California in 2008, with Sonoma Coast and Anderson Valley delivering fantastic results from this grape. Elsewhere in United States, Washington State and Oregon had highly successful harvests in 2008 despite some early worries about frost. However, it was France who had the best of the weather and growing conditions in 2008, and this year was one of the great vintages for Champagne, the Médoc in Bordeaux, Languedoc-Roussillon and Provence, with Pinot Noir, Cabernet Sauvignon and Chardonnay grapes leading the way. Italy, too, shared many of these ideal conditions, with the wineries in Tuscany claiming that their Chianti Classicos of 2008 will be ones to collect, and Piedmont's Barberesco and Barolo wines will be recognized as amongst the finest of the past decade.

Region: Valle Central

The Valle Central of Chile is one of the world's most fascinating and unique wine regions, being a New World region with a history which stretches back several centuries to the time of the first European settlers on the South American continent. Although those original settlers brought their vines across the ocean for the production of sacramental wine, the way they flourished on Chilean soil was not ignored. Over the centuries, the vineyards around the Maipo and Maule valleys grew and grew, and now the Valle Central is the most productive wine region of South America, producing many of Chile's most characterful and flavorful wines. Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot varietal grapes are grown and processed in huge quantities for the international market, but there are also many vineyards dealing with high quality Sauvignon Blanc, Chardonnay and Carmenere grapes which are constantly gaining attention and praise from critics and wine drinkers around the world.

Country: Chile

Whilst being widely regarded as definitively 'New World' as a wine producing country, Chile has actually been cultivating grapevines for wine production for over five hundred years. The Iberian conquistadors first introduced vines to Chile with which to make sacramental wines, and although these were considerably different in everything from flavor, aroma and character to the wines we associate with Chile today, the country has a long and interesting heritage when it comes to this drink. Chilean wine production as we know it first arose in the country in the mid to late 19th century, when wealthy landowners and industrialists first began planting vineyards as a way of adopting some European class and style. They quickly discovered that the hot climate, sloping mountainsides and oceanic winds provided a perfect terroir for quality wines, and many of these original estates remain today in all their grandeur and beauty, still producing the wines which made the country famous.