Masi Amarone Della Valpolicella Mazzano  2003 750ml
SKU 751977

Masi Amarone Della Valpolicella Mazzano 2003

Masi - Veneto - Italy - Valpolicella

Professional Wine Reviews for Masi Amarone Della Valpolicella Mazzano 2003

Rated 93 by Wine Spectator
Offers aromas of prune and date, with a good dose of oak that takes on a coffee grinds character on the palate. Full-bodied and sturdy, with a combination of fruit and oak tannins that give a long, firm finish, carrying a concentrated core of fruit. Mazzano is always a big, chewy wine when young. Needs lots of time. Best after 2011.
Rated 92 by Robert Parker
The 2003 Amarone della Valpolicella Classico Mazzano is a large-scaled, full-throttle wine loaded with super-ripe dark fruit, mocha, chocolate, leather, grilled herbs and spices. The fruit verges...
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$137.24
Bottle
$133.04
12 Bottle
(case price $1596.48)
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750ml
93Wine Spectator
92Robert Parker

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Additional Information on Masi Amarone Della Valpolicella Mazzano 2003

Winery: Masi

Varietal: Corvina Blend

The Corvina varietal grape is one of Italy's most famous products, and is used in the production of some of the country's most famous and widely admired wine. Amarone and Valpolicella wines use a high percentage of Corvina grapes, and these wines make the most of the grapes' bright crimson color, and richness of sour cherry flavors Because the Corvina grape has a naturally high level of fruit acid, it is perfect for barrel aging This process rounds out the harsher, bitterer aspects of the grape, and produces wonderfully soft, mellow yet complex red wines. Most commonly associated with the region of Veneto, Corvina grapes have, in recent decades, been planted in several New World countries eager to emulate the fine wines found in Italy.

Region: Veneto

As historically one of the most important regions in the world regarding trade and experimentation, it comes as no surprise to discover that Veneto has always been a well respected and innovative wine region. This area of north-easterly area of Italy benefits greatly from a continental climate tempered by the Alps, and plenty of influence from the Germanic countries it is near to. Veneto is most commonly associated with beautifully elegant white wines, such as those of Soave, and has over ninety thousand hectares under vine. Impressively, within that area, over a third of the vineyards in the Veneto region have been granted official AOC status, and many of the sub-regions and appellations of Veneto have gone on to be world-famous in regards to quality. One such example is Valpolicella, where some of Italy's finest and most complex red wines are produced.

Country: Italy

It isn't difficult to understand why Italy is famed not just for the quality of its wines, but also for the vast variety and range of characteristics found in the wines there. The terrain of the country varies wildly, from the lush rolling green hills and valley of Tuscany, to the sun drenched rocky coasts of Sicily, the mountainous and alpine regions of the north, and the marshy lowlands of the east. Italy really does have a little bit of everything. Combine this huge range of landscapes with an almost perfect climate for grape cultivation, and you have a country seemingly designed for viticultural excellence. The results speak for themselves, and it is clear to see that wine has become an inseparable part of Italian culture as a result of its abundance and brilliance. Each village, city and region has a local wine perfectly matched with the cuisine of the area, and not an evening passes without the vast majority of Italian families raising a glass of locally sourced wine with pride and pleasure.