SKU 762789

Next Of Kyn (Sine Qua Non) Syrah 2008

Next Of Kyn (Sine Qua Non) - California - United States - Santa Barbara

Professional Wine Reviews for Next Of Kyn (Sine Qua Non) Syrah 2008

Rated 96 by Robert Parker
Dark fruit, camphor, licorice, smoke and mocha flesh out in this gorgeous, delineated wine. The 2008 impresses for its length and persistence. Today, it is more refined and elegant than when I tasted it a year ago. The 2008 is 82% Syrah, 13.5% Grenache and 4.5% Roussanne (all destemmed) that spent approximately 32 months in French oak.
Rated 95 by Decanter
Very intense nose of crushed blackberries, spices and minerals. Some tar. Full-bodied, with a wonderful depth of fruit and super fine tannins. Finishes... read more... Additional information »
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96 Robert Parker
95 Decanter
94 Wine Spectator
94 Stephen Tanzer

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Additional Information on Next Of Kyn (Sine Qua Non) Syrah 2008

Winery: Next Of Kyn (Sine Qua Non)

Vintage: 2008

2008 saw very high yields across wineries in much of the southern hemisphere, as a result of highly favorable climatic conditions. Although in many areas, these high yields brought with them something of a drop in overall quality, this could not be said for South Australia's wines, which were reportedly excellent. Indeed, the 2008 Shiraz harvest in South Australia is said to be one of the most successful in recent decades, and western Australia's Chardonnays are set to be ones to watch out for. New Zealand's Pinot Noir harvest was also very good, with wineries in Martinborough reportedly very excited about this particular grape and the characteristics it revealed this year. Pinot Noir also grew very well in the United States, and was probably the most successful grape varietal to come out of California in 2008, with Sonoma Coast and Anderson Valley delivering fantastic results from this grape. Elsewhere in United States, Washington State and Oregon had highly successful harvests in 2008 despite some early worries about frost. However, it was France who had the best of the weather and growing conditions in 2008, and this year was one of the great vintages for Champagne, the Médoc in Bordeaux, Languedoc-Roussillon and Provence, with Pinot Noir, Cabernet Sauvignon and Chardonnay grapes leading the way. Italy, too, shared many of these ideal conditions, with the wineries in Tuscany claiming that their Chianti Classicos of 2008 will be ones to collect, and Piedmont's Barberesco and Barolo wines will be recognized as amongst the finest of the past decade.

Varietal: Syrah

There continues to be much debate surrounding the name of the Shiraz/Syrah grape varietal, with many experts still quite unsure which came first. Indeed, even the origins of this varietal are more or less unknown, despite it being most commonly associated with the Rhone Valley of France, and New World countries, most notably Australia. However, its popularity and unique characteristics have seen it planted all over the world, where it continues to impress with its powerful flavors and wonderfully spicy notes of pepper and clove. Shiraz/Syrah wines are renowned also for their versatility, and are regularly used in single variety still and sparkling wines, as well as blended and oak aged wines which demonstrate its ability to express its terroir and secondary flavors very well.

Region: California

California has long been the New World's most important and prodigious wine producing regions, with a history which stretches back to the 18th century and the Spanish pioneers who settled here. Today, California produces vast quantities of wine, and if it were a country, it would be the fourth largest producer of wine on earth. Despite experiencing many problems in the mid 20th century, including a very serious blight which almost crippled the state's wine industry, the ideal terroir and excellent climate ensured that Californian wines soon became the envy of the New World once again. California produces a vast range of wines, and utilizes a long list of fine grape varietals, with many wineries and their produce more closely resembling those of France and other Old World countries in regards to character, practices and flavors

Country: United States

The first European settlers to consider growing grapevines in the United States must have been delighted when they discovered the now famous wine regions within California, Oregon and elsewhere. Not even in the Old World are there such fertile valleys, made ideal for vine cultivation by the blazing sunshine, long, hot summers and oceanic breezes. As such, it comes as little surprise that today more than eighty-nine percent of United States wines are grown in the valleys and on the mountainsides of California, where arguably some of the finest produce in the world is found. However, American wine does not begin and end with California, and due to the vast size of the country and the incredible range of terrains and climates found within the United States, there is probably no other country on earth which produces such a massive diversity of wines. From ice wines in the northern states, to sparkling wines, aromatized wines, fortified wines, reds, whites, rosés and more, the United States has endless surprises in store for lovers of New World wines.

Appellation: Santa Barbara

Santa Barbara is often overlooked as a wine region, however, the quality of the producing coming out of this coastal county cannot be ignored – many of the best New World red wines hail from Santa Barbara, and the wineries of the region are consistently impressing with their flair for experimentation. For over a hundred years, Santa Barbara has been using the blazing Californian sunshine and cooling Pacific Ocean breezes to produce classic French grape varietals of stunning quality and distinction, leading many people to refer to the county as the 'Californian Provence'. Indeed, the terroir of Santa Barbara is not so dissimilar to that of many great French wine regions, and this may go some way to explain why the red and white wines which are produced there pack in so many interesting and enticing features.