Rocca Di Fabbri Montefalco Rosso  2010 750ml
SKU 747967

Rocca Di Fabbri Montefalco Rosso 2010

Rocca Di Fabbri - Umbria - Italy - Montefalco

Professional Wine Reviews for Rocca Di Fabbri Montefalco Rosso 2010

Rated 87 by Wine Spectator
This rustic red displays attractive tobacco, brick dust and game undertones to the chewy plum and cherry core. Drink now.
Rated 86 by Wine Enthusiast
A blend of Sangiovese, Montepulciano and Sagrantino, this boasts ripe raspberry, cherry and coffee bean sensations, lifted up by notes of white pepper, mint and sage. You’ll also detect a green, astringent woody accent on the close.
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750ml
87Wine Spectator
86Wine Enthusiast

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Additional Information on Rocca Di Fabbri Montefalco Rosso 2010

Winery: Rocca Di Fabbri

Vintage: 2010

2010 saw extremely high quality viticulture in many parts of the world, with an exceptionally long and hot summer providing huge benefits for wineries across many countries, especially in the southern hemisphere. The northern hemisphere and Europe saw something of a cooler summer and flowering period, but this was by no means as disastrous as it could have been. France, especially, had a fantastic year in 2010, with the world renowned Burgundy region proclaiming that their white wines of this year are ones to look out for, and despite yields being relatively small across much of the country, the quality was exceptionally high. Spain, too, received some cooler weather, but Rioja and the rest of central Spain are hailing 2010 as a very good year indeed, again as a result of smaller, finer yields. California also received similar climatic conditions, but again, wineries are highly positive about the overall effect this had on their produce, as the slightly challenging conditions resulted in smaller yields of much elegance and distinction. 2010 was really Australia's year, and in South Australia and across the Mornington Peninsula, Chardonnay vines produced good yields with a lower sugar level than in previous years. As such, the majority of South Australian white wines from 2010 are superb, and packed full of character. Shiraz also had a great year, and most Australian wineries have been proclaiming 2010 one of the great vintages. Both the Argentinian and Chilean wine industries benefited from some ideal climatic conditions this year, and are reportedly ecstatically pleased with the fact that their 2010 wines ended up with lower alcohol levels, and were beautifully balanced wines packed full of flavor.

Varietal: Sangiovese

Wines made with the round, darkly colored Sangiovese grape varietal tend to demonstrate the grape's key attributes: high acidity, moderate tannins and pale red color These grapes have been grown in their native Italy for thousands of years, and are said to be one of the key varietals which were so loved by the ancient Etruscan and Roman civilization Fast forward a few millennia, and all over the world, wineries are still growing these grapes in order to capture that renowned and flavorful essence. What makes Sangiovese so loved by drinkers and vintners alike is its wonderful ability to soak up the earthy, woody flavors of the oak barrels they are aged in, and present these in the glass alongside fresh, bright summer fruit notes. Whilst Sangiovese grapes are often blended during the fermentation process, they are also drank as single variety wines, both young and fresh, and aged and complex.

Region: Umbria

Despite being one of Italy's smallest wine regions, the central Italian region of Umbria is a vitally important one, and home to many of the country's finest and most historic wines and wineries. The reputation of Umbrian wines may have suffered in the 1970s, along with the produce of much of the rest of the country, but the 1980s and 1990s saw significant efforts made by vintners when it came to improving their produce and overall image. By consulting international oenologists, the wineries of Umbria were able to update their traditional techniques, and produce considerably finer wines from their Sangiovese grapes, as well as from imported varietals such as Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot and Chardonnay. Indeed, the barrel fermented white wines of Umbria, now made with a blend of Chardonnay and Grechetto varietal grapes, has gone on to be something of a flagship product for the region, and is regarded as one of the best and most characterful white wines in Italy.

Country: Italy

There are few countries in the world with a viticultural history as long or as illustrious as that claimed by Italy. Grapes were first being grown and cultivated on Italian soil several thousand years ago by the Greeks and the Pheonicians, who named Italy 'Oenotria' – the land of wines – so impressed were they with the climate and the suitability of the soil for wine production. Of course, it was the rise of the Roman Empire which had the most lasting influence on wine production in Italy, and their influence can still be felt today, as much of the riches of the empire came about through their enthusiasm for producing wines and exporting it to neighbouring countries. Since those times, a vast amount of Italian land has remained primarily for vine cultivation, and thousands of wineries can be found throughout the entire length and breadth of this beautiful country, drenched in Mediterranean sunshine and benefiting from the excellent fertile soils found there. Italy remains very much a 'land of wines', and one could not imagine this country, its landscape and culture, without it.