SKU 764800

Ryme Cellars Aglianico Luna Matta Vyd 2011

Ryme Cellars - California - United States - San Luis Obispo - Paso Robles

Professional Wine Reviews for Ryme Cellars Aglianico Luna Matta Vyd 2011

Rated 92 by Decanter
Ryme's 2011 Aglianico Luna Matta Vineyard is gorgeous. Even though the 2011 spent three years in barrel, the flavors remain quite primary. Smoke, game, tobacco, anise and dark fruit flesh out as this striking, deeply expressive wine shows off its personality. The 2013 finishes with notable intensity and power, virtually covering the 100% whole clusters. Located in Paso Robles, Luna Matta is one of the few sites capable of growing top-flight Aglianico, the grape that informs Taurasi, often called the Barolo of Southern Italy. (Galloni)
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Additional Information on Ryme Cellars Aglianico Luna Matta Vyd 2011

Winery: Ryme Cellars

Vintage: 2011

The year 2011 was an interesting year for many northern and central European countries, as the weather was more than unpredictable in the spring and summer. However, in most countries, the climatic conditions thankfully settled down in the late summer and fall. The result of this slightly difficult year of weather in France was a set of surprisingly small yields, but overall, these yields were of a higher quality than those harvested in certain previous years. A fantastic set of wines was also made in Italy and Spain, and the Rioja wines - when released - are set to be very good indeed. Austria also had superb year in 2011, with almost fifty percent more grapes being grown and used for their distinctive Gruner Veltliner wines than in the year before. Possibly the European country which had the finest 2011, though, was Portugal, with wineries in the Douro region claiming this year to be one of the best in decades for the production of Port wine, and the bright, young Vinho Verdes wines. In the New World, the Pacific Northwest saw some of the best weather of 2011, and Washington State and Oregon reportedly had a highly successful year, especially for the cultivation of high quality red wine grapes. Chile and Argentina had a relatively cool year, which certainly helped retain the character of many of their key grape varietals, and should make for some exciting drinking. South Africa had especially good weather for their white wine grape varietals, particularly Chardonnay and Sauvignon Blanc, and many South African wineries are reporting 2011 as one of their best years in recent memory.

Varietal: Aglianico

Aglianico grapes are typically grown in the Campania region of southern Italy, where they have been an important grape varietal since the height of the Roman empire. The Romans adored their deep garnet coloured wines, and the Aglianico grape provided a beautiful colour along with high acid levels and a strong tannin content, which made it wildly popular both then and today. Nowadays, the finest Aglianico wines are usually aged in wood to soften their strong tannins, and this process allows the grapes to reveal their complex flavours of plum and chocolate, along with plenty of pleasing dark fruit and berry aromas. Often, Aglianico grapes are blended with Bordeaux varietals to make a wonderfully balanced wine. The varietal thrives most successfully in hot and dry regions, and has a particular affinity for volcanic soils.

Region: California

California has long been the New World's most important and prodigious wine producing regions, with a history which stretches back to the 18th century and the Spanish pioneers who settled here. Today, California produces vast quantities of wine, and if it were a country, it would be the fourth largest producer of wine on earth. Despite experiencing many problems in the mid 20th century, including a very serious blight which almost crippled the state's wine industry, the ideal terroir and excellent climate ensured that Californian wines soon became the envy of the New World once again. California produces a vast range of wines, and utilizes a long list of fine grape varietals, with many wineries and their produce more closely resembling those of France and other Old World countries in regards to character, practices and flavors

Country: United States

The first European settlers to consider growing grapevines in the United States must have been delighted when they discovered the now famous wine regions within California, Oregon and elsewhere. Not even in the Old World are there such fertile valleys, made ideal for vine cultivation by the blazing sunshine, long, hot summers and oceanic breezes. As such, it comes as little surprise that today more than eighty-nine percent of United States wines are grown in the valleys and on the mountainsides of California, where arguably some of the finest produce in the world is found. However, American wine does not begin and end with California, and due to the vast size of the country and the incredible range of terrains and climates found within the United States, there is probably no other country on earth which produces such a massive diversity of wines. From ice wines in the northern states, to sparkling wines, aromatized wines, fortified wines, reds, whites, rosés and more, the United States has endless surprises in store for lovers of New World wines.