Vino Dei Fratelli Nero D'avola  2011 750ml
SKU 739759

Vino Dei Fratelli Nero D'avola 2011

Vino Dei Fratelli - Sicily - Italy
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Additional Information on Vino Dei Fratelli Nero D'avola 2011

Vintage: 2011

The year 2011 was an interesting year for many northern and central European countries, as the weather was more than unpredictable in the spring and summer. However, in most countries, the climatic conditions thankfully settled down in the late summer and fall. The result of this slightly difficult year of weather in France was a set of surprisingly small yields, but overall, these yields were of a higher quality than those harvested in certain previous years. A fantastic set of wines was also made in Italy and Spain, and the Rioja wines - when released - are set to be very good indeed. Austria also had superb year in 2011, with almost fifty percent more grapes being grown and used for their distinctive Gruner Veltliner wines than in the year before. Possibly the European country which had the finest 2011, though, was Portugal, with wineries in the Douro region claiming this year to be one of the best in decades for the production of Port wine, and the bright, young Vinho Verdes wines. In the New World, the Pacific Northwest saw some of the best weather of 2011, and Washington State and Oregon reportedly had a highly successful year, especially for the cultivation of high quality red wine grapes. Chile and Argentina had a relatively cool year, which certainly helped retain the character of many of their key grape varietals, and should make for some exciting drinking. South Africa had especially good weather for their white wine grape varietals, particularly Chardonnay and Sauvignon Blanc, and many South African wineries are reporting 2011 as one of their best years in recent memory.

Varietal: Nero D'avola

Sicilian wines are renowned for their brightness and fruitiness, and one of the most important grape varietals grown on this Italian island region is the Nero d'Avola, an ancient and indigenous grape which is responsible for many of Sicily's finest wines. Deep, dark and complex, the Nero d'Avola is often compared with Australia's Shiraz grape as a result of its spicy, peppery nature, and strong flavors of plums and autumn fruits. Nero d'Avola is also well known for being one of the primary grape varietals for the production of Marsala wine, a flavorful and slightly viscous fortified wine which is popular across the globe. The grape flourishes best in hot, dry and arid conditions, and has had some success in New World countries in recent years.

Region: Sicily

Sicily has been an important wine region for thousands of years, with the ancient Greek settlers being among the first to discover its remarkable aptitude for viticulture. It isn't difficult to understand why they were impressed, and nor is it hard to understand why the island's wine industry continues to boom to this day. The climate on Sicily is ideal for wine production sunshine beating down on the vineyards almost all year round, and a highly fertile volcanic soil produced from such magnificent peaks as Mount Etna. Sicily's vineyards are mostly used for the production of sweet dessert wines and fortified wines, such as the famous wine of Marsala, but the variety found across the island is impressive, and results in a great range of dry white and red wines packed full of exciting fruit flavors.

Country: Italy

It isn't difficult to understand why Italy is famed not just for the quality of its wines, but also for the vast variety and range of characteristics found in the wines there. The terrain of the country varies wildly, from the lush rolling green hills and valley of Tuscany, to the sun drenched rocky coasts of Sicily, the mountainous and alpine regions of the north, and the marshy lowlands of the east. Italy really does have a little bit of everything. Combine this huge range of landscapes with an almost perfect climate for grape cultivation, and you have a country seemingly designed for viticultural excellence. The results speak for themselves, and it is clear to see that wine has become an inseparable part of Italian culture as a result of its abundance and brilliance. Each village, city and region has a local wine perfectly matched with the cuisine of the area, and not an evening passes without the vast majority of Italian families raising a glass of locally sourced wine with pride and pleasure.