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Donnachiara Taurasi 2011 750ml

Rated 92 - Opaque, glass-staining ruby. Refined aromas and flavors of red cherry and plum, complicated by hints of flint and tar. Compellingly...
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Mastroberardino Taurasi Radici 2009 750ml

Rated 94 - The 2009 Taurasi Radici represents a special selection of grapes from two areas: Mirabella and Montemarano. The first vineyard sits at...
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Terredora Taurasi Pago Dei Fusi 2009 750ml

Rated 90 - Moderately saturated ruby-red. Dark plum, tobacco and a hint of game on the deep nose. Very savory flavors of dark plum, black cherry,...

Campania

Campania is a region of southern Italy in Europe. The region has a population of around 5.8 million people, making it the second-most-populous region of Italy; its total area of 13,595 km² makes it the most densely populated region in the country.[1] Located on the Italian Peninsula, with the Tyrrhenian Sea to the west, the small Flegrean Islands and Capri are also administratively part of the region.

Records show that wine making has been going on in this region since the 13th century B.C. As much else in this region, traditionally wines are intended for immediate pleasure and consumption. This has led many to consider the local wines as second-class products, a thought strongly expressed by Burton Anderson in his 1990 "Wine Atlas of Italy", where he bluntly states that the noteworthy winemakers in the region could be "counted on one's fingers".

The last decades of the last century though, have seen a dynamic resurgence in Campania and distinctive wines have popped up in many provinces, bringing the DOC denominations from nine in 1975 to 19 by the end of 2000.

Especially in the Taurasi DOCG zone, a handful of winemakers have been pro-actively producing wide arrays of notable reds and whites that have acquired national respect. In addition to Taurasi, there are two other "boutique" reds that debuted in 1994 and have since acquired a respectable status in Italy.

The arguably best-known Campania wine is the Lacrima Christi or, "Tears of Christ". Though, in the past, it was so overproduced that it almost ruined its reputation, in more recent years serious efforts have been made by local winemakers to restore its former status and have so far met with some success.

Campania has several native grapes such as Fiano, a grape known to the Romans as Viti Apiana, Greco, that was first introduced by the Greeks, Coda di Volpe, so named by Pliny after the shape of the grape cluster and Pedirosso.