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2012 California Central Coast Contra Costa County Zinfandel

California as a wine producing region has grown in size and importance considerably over the past couple of centuries, and today is the proud producer of more than ninety percent of the United States' wines. Indeed, if California was a country, it would be the fourth largest producer of wine in the world, with a vast range of vineyards covering almost half a million acres. The secret to California's success as a wine region has a lot to do with the high quality of its soils, and the fact that it has an extensive Pacific coastline which perfectly tempers the blazing sunshine it experiences all year round. The winds coming off the ocean cool the vines, and the natural valleys and mountainsides which make up most of the state's wine regions make for ideal areas in which to cultivate a variety of high quality grapes.
The long and narrow Central Coast wine region of California stretches for approximately two hundred and fifty miles down the Pacific coastline, and holds hundreds of important Californian wineries who grow a wide array of imported grape varietals. As with the rest of California, the Central Coast region benefits enormously from the hot and sunny climate, which allows the grapes grown there to reach full ripeness and express plenty of big, juicy flavors and rich aromas. Dozens of grapes varietals are grown successfully on the Central Coast, however, classic French varietals such as Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot. The region is renowned for its modern and experimental approach to viticulture, and with over 90,000 acres under vine, this is a veritable powerhouse of wine production in one of the most important New World regions on earth.
The precise origins of what became known as the Zinfandel grape variety are uncertain, although it has clear genetic equivalents in both Puglia and Croatia. However, when it was brought to the New World in the mid 19th century, it became known as the Zinfandel, and has been consistently popular and widely grown ever since. These very dark and very round grapes have a remarkably high sugar content, resulting in relatively high levels of alcohol in the wines they are made into, with bottles often displaying as much as fifteen percent. What makes the Zinfandel such an interesting grape, though, is the fact that the flavors produced by this varietal vary considerably depending on the climate they are grown in. In cooler valley regions, the Zinfandel grapes result in wines which hold strong flavors of tart and sweet fruits; raspberry, redcurrant and sweet cherry, held in a very smooth and silky liquid. Conversely, warmer regions result in more complex and spicy notes, including anise, pepper and hedgerow berries.