Aguijon De Abeja Bonarda Catamarca 2017 750ml
SKU 833989

Aguijon De Abeja Bonarda Catamarca 2017

Patagonia - Argentina

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Additional Information on Aguijon De Abeja Bonarda Catamarca 2017

Winery Aguijon De Abeja

Region: Patagonia

Patagonia is not a region which immediately comes to mind when considering ideal locations for viticulture, which is something which makes Patagonia's annual output of fine wines all the more impressive. Situated in the very south of South America, and lying on both the Argentinian and Chilean sides of the Andean mountains, Patagonia has been settled in by many different nationalities over the centuries, making it a fascinating place for wine production and culture. Perhaps due to the eclectic mix of people who made Patagonia their home, the wines of the region are an interesting mix of many European style wines – far more 'old world' in style than other wines found elsewhere in Argentina or Chile. Whilst red wine varietals such as Pinot Noir and Malbec thrive quite happily in the Patagonian soils, it is the region's white wine grapes; Riesling, Sauvignon Blanc and Gewurztraminer which are most widely admired for the wines they produce.

Country: Argentina

It is said that the first Argentinian vines were planted in the Mendoza more than four hundred years ago by European settlers, and despite these early wines being used primarily for religious purposes, the fervor for wine making never left the area. Today, Argentina is keen to demonstrate its technological prowess when it comes to vineyard cultivation, by combining traditional methods of irrigation left over from the Huarpes Indians with modern techniques in order to make the dry, arid desert an ideal environment for growing grapes. Indeed, these ancient irrigation channels, dug hundreds of years ago and still in use today, bring mineral-rich melt water from the Andes via the Mendoza river, something which gives the grapes grown in this region some of their character. The primary grape of this and other regions of Argentina is the Malbec, which is highly susceptible to rot in its native France, but which thrives in the dry and hot climate of South America, producing rich and plummy wines which are highly drinkable especially when young.