envelope
Alta Pavina Pinot Noir Citius 2009 750ml
SKU 748900
This wine is currently unavailable

Alta Pavina Citius Pinot Noir 2009

Castilla Y Leon - Spain

Professional Wine Reviews for Alta Pavina Citius Pinot Noir 2009

Rated 90 by Robert Parker
The 2009 Pinot Noir Citius is a rare Pinot Noir, planted in 1985 at 1,000 meters altitude in Ribera del Duero (but without the right to have the appellation, as the grape is not contemplated) on chalky, stony soils, and aged in barrel for two years. It is bright ruby-colored, limpid and with a nose that shows musky cherries, strawberries and violets, perhaps blood oranges and some spices, quite restrained, elegant and balanced with some dusty aromas in the background. The palate is light to medium-bodied, with good freshness and acidity, silky and soft, easy to drink but again with some blurry flavors that bring back the muskiness of the nose, which make me hesitate. It's really polished and sleek and should be consumed in the short-term. 35,000 bottles produced. Drink now-2016. I also tasted a new blend of Pinot Noir and Tempranillo, but the wine felt very dizzy after the recent bottling.
read more...
Additional information »

Other Vintages:
2010 2009
Out of Stock
I've Had This
90 Robert Parker

Alta Pavina Citius Pinot Noir 2009 Customer Reviews

Product Rating  

There have been no reviews for this product. Be first to .

Customer also bought

Additional Information on Alta Pavina Citius Pinot Noir 2009

Winery Alta Pavina

Vintage: 2009

Despite less than ideal climatic conditions, featuring storms which threatened an otherwise perfect year, most parts of California had an excellent year for viticulture. Chardonnays and Sauvignon Blancs were picked at optimum ripeness, and Californian white wine was just about as good as it could be. Surprises and overcoming difficulties summed up much of the United States' wine industry in 2009, and many of the results from Oregon, Washington State and all over California speak for themselves, with the flagship Cabernet Sauvignon grapes having developed healthy, thick skins and thus plenty of character and distinction. Elsewhere in the New World, South Africa had a very good year in 2009, and wineries across the cape of the African continent are proclaiming it a truly great vintage. In most of Europe, fine weather and punctual ripening periods produced some excellent wines, with many of the best coming out of France's Bordeaux and the surrounding regions. Merlot had an exceptionally good year in France, and wineries are proclaiming that the 2009 Merlot harvest was one of the best in living memory. Indeed, across most of France, ripening was relatively even, and red wine grapes such as Cabernet Franc, Syrah and others were reportedly highly characterful, with plenty of the required tannin levels with which to make high quality wines. Italy, too, had a very good 2009. Piedmont reported extremely favorable conditions throughout 2009, and their signature Nebbiolo grapes were more or less perfect when harvested, having benefited from the slight drop in temperature at the end of their ripening period. Veneto, too, had an enviable year, producing superb Pinot Grigio and Chardonnay wines in 2009.

Varietal: Pinot Noir

Pinot Noir translates as 'black pine' in French, and is named as such due to the extremely inky color of the fruits, which hang in bunches the shape of a pine cone. Wineries often struggle with Pinot Noir vines, as more than most red wine grape varietals, they fail in hot temperatures and are rather susceptible to various diseases which can be disastrous when hoping for a late harvest. Thanks to new technologies and methods for avoiding such problems, however, the Pinot Noir grape varietal has spread across the world to almost every major wine producing country. Why? Quite simply because this is considered to be one of the finest grape varietals one can cultivate, due to the fact that it can be used to produce a wide range of excellent wines full of interesting, fresh and fascinating flavors Their thin skins result in a fairly light-bodied wine, and the juices carry beautiful notes of summer fruits, currants and berries, and many, many more.

Region: Castilla Y Leon

In the heart of Spain, we find the beautiful - if somewhat arid and occasionally desolate - wine region of Castilla y Leon. Castilla y Leon is the largest wine region in Spain, covering a huge plateau rising up from its surroundings, and characterized by its dry and cracked soils, and intense summer heat. Such weather conditions can often make viticulture difficult, but the wineries which work in the region have generations of experience and expertise when it comes to making the most of the beautiful red and white wine grape varietals which grow well there. From Tempranillo to Verdejo, Castilla y Leon really has something to suit every palate, and offers the world a range of wines full of the passion and flavors of Spain.

Country: Spain

For over two thousand years, Spain has been responsible for much of Europe's wine production, making the very best of native grape varietals, and more recently experimenting with and perfecting wines made from imported grapes. Of course, the region of La Rioja is renowned world-wide for the quality and characteristics of its wines, which benefit greatly from the warm, dry continental climate of the area, and the fertile soils of the Ebro river basin. However, there is far more to Spanish produce than the complex, aromatic and earthy red wine of this region, as a result of the vast range of wine making traditions and practices, and terrains and climatic conditions found across the country. The region Castilla y Leon produces some of Europe's finest white wines, and the sparkling wines of Cava and the sherries of Jerez are firm favorites for wine lovers around the world.