Altos Las Hormigas Bonarda Colonia Las Liebres 2020 750ml

size
750ml
country
Argentina
region
Cuyo
appellation
Mendoza
90
WA
Additional vintages
2020 2019 2018 2013
90
WA
Rated 90 by Wine Advocate
They define their approachable and very affordable red 2020 Colonia Las Liebres Bonarda Clásica, a wine created in 2003 that has had great commercial success, as a bistrot or trattoria wine that they started to give relevance to the grape, the most planted in Argentina, that until then was relegated to blends and anonymous table wines. The house style is to keep moderate alcohol and good freshness that this year blends 90% of their grapes from Luján de Cuyo and, for the first time, 10% grapes from their new property Jardín de Altamira where the limestone soils and higher altitude already add tension to the wine even in a warmer year like 2020. It fermented in 3,000-liter stainless steel vats with indigenous yeasts and matured in concrete. It has a very expressive nose with notes of wild herbs and plants, very juicy and tasty, primary and straightforward, medium-bodied and balanced. This is very easy to drink and really very good for what it is. 115,000 bottles produced. It was bottled in September 2020. ... More details
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Altos Las Hormigas Bonarda Colonia Las Liebres 2020 750ml

SKU 847497
Case Only Purchase
$8.82
/750ml bottle
Quantity
min order 12 bottles
* This item is available for online ordering only. It can be picked up or shipped from our location within 4-6 business days. ?
Professional Ratings
90
WA
90
WA
Rated 90 by Wine Advocate
They define their approachable and very affordable red 2020 Colonia Las Liebres Bonarda Clásica, a wine created in 2003 that has had great commercial success, as a bistrot or trattoria wine that they started to give relevance to the grape, the most planted in Argentina, that until then was relegated to blends and anonymous table wines. The house style is to keep moderate alcohol and good freshness that this year blends 90% of their grapes from Luján de Cuyo and, for the first time, 10% grapes from their new property Jardín de Altamira where the limestone soils and higher altitude already add tension to the wine even in a warmer year like 2020. It fermented in 3,000-liter stainless steel vats with indigenous yeasts and matured in concrete. It has a very expressive nose with notes of wild herbs and plants, very juicy and tasty, primary and straightforward, medium-bodied and balanced. This is very easy to drink and really very good for what it is. 115,000 bottles produced. It was bottled in September 2020.
Winery
Although originally an Italian grape variety from Piedmont and the Oltrepo-Pavese region, the Bonarda grape has enjoyed much greater success in the rich soils and generous climate of Argentina, where it is one of the main grape varieties grown. The wine is dense, inky, and purple, with a rustic, hearty juiciness, ripe acidity, and warm tannins, perfect for any meal and barbeques. The grapes come from the warmer regions of Rivadavia and East Mendoza.
Product Details
size
750ml
country
Argentina
region
Cuyo
appellation
Mendoza
Additional vintages
2020 2019 2018 2013
Overview
Rated 90 - They define their approachable and very affordable red 2020 Colonia Las Liebres Bonarda Clásica, a wine created in 2003 that has had great commercial success, as a bistrot or trattoria wine that they started to give relevance to the grape, the most planted in Argentina, that until then was relegated to blends and anonymous table wines. The house style is to keep moderate alcohol and good freshness that this year blends 90% of their grapes from Luján de Cuyo and, for the first time, 10% grapes from their new property Jardín de Altamira where the limestone soils and higher altitude already add tension to the wine even in a warmer year like 2020. It fermented in 3,000-liter stainless steel vats with indigenous yeasts and matured in concrete. It has a very expressive nose with notes of wild herbs and plants, very juicy and tasty, primary and straightforward, medium-bodied and balanced. This is very easy to drink and really very good for what it is. 115,000 bottles produced. It was bottled in September 2020.
barrel

Region: Cuyo

The region of Cuyo has been internationally associated with fine Argentinian wine for several decades, and has a wine history which stretches back centuries to the time of the original Spanish settlers, who sought areas in which to plant imported grape vines for sacramental wine production. The region contains several of Argentina's most renowned and widely appreciated provinces, including the Mendoza, La Rioja, San Juan and San Luis, and the mountainous nature of this arid region provides an ideal environment for vineyard cultivation. As the mighty Desaguadero River snakes its way between the Andes, it deposits plenty of important minerals in the soil, which allow grape varietals closely associated with the Argentinian wine industry – such as Malbec – to grow to a perfect level of ripeness. As such, even in the driest areas of the Cuyo region, flavorful and fruit-forward wines are produced in impressive amounts.
fields

Country: Argentina

Anyone who has been the Mendoza area of Argentina may be surprised to find that this is one of the primary wine regions of the country, now comfortably sitting as the fifth largest producer of wine in the world. The Mendoza is an incredibly dry and arid desert, which receives as little as two hundred millimeters of rainfall per year, and supports very little life at all. We can thank the ancient technologies of the Huarpes Indians for Argentina's current booming wine trade, as they managed to irrigate the region by digging channels from the Mendoza river, thus creating an area which had enough access to water with which to grow vines. Not only this, but the grape which Argentina primarily uses for their wines – Malbec – actually flourishes in such conditions, as it is less likely to suffer from the rot it so often finds in the considerably damper regions of Europe it has its origins in. Such expertise and foresight has resulted in Argentina being able to produce high quality wines of both red and white types, with Malbec, Bonarda and Cabernet Sauvignon dominating the vineyards for red wines, and Torrontés, Chardonnay and Chenin Blanc making up for most of the white wine produced there.
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More Details
barrel

Region: Cuyo

The region of Cuyo has been internationally associated with fine Argentinian wine for several decades, and has a wine history which stretches back centuries to the time of the original Spanish settlers, who sought areas in which to plant imported grape vines for sacramental wine production. The region contains several of Argentina's most renowned and widely appreciated provinces, including the Mendoza, La Rioja, San Juan and San Luis, and the mountainous nature of this arid region provides an ideal environment for vineyard cultivation. As the mighty Desaguadero River snakes its way between the Andes, it deposits plenty of important minerals in the soil, which allow grape varietals closely associated with the Argentinian wine industry – such as Malbec – to grow to a perfect level of ripeness. As such, even in the driest areas of the Cuyo region, flavorful and fruit-forward wines are produced in impressive amounts.
fields

Country: Argentina

Anyone who has been the Mendoza area of Argentina may be surprised to find that this is one of the primary wine regions of the country, now comfortably sitting as the fifth largest producer of wine in the world. The Mendoza is an incredibly dry and arid desert, which receives as little as two hundred millimeters of rainfall per year, and supports very little life at all. We can thank the ancient technologies of the Huarpes Indians for Argentina's current booming wine trade, as they managed to irrigate the region by digging channels from the Mendoza river, thus creating an area which had enough access to water with which to grow vines. Not only this, but the grape which Argentina primarily uses for their wines – Malbec – actually flourishes in such conditions, as it is less likely to suffer from the rot it so often finds in the considerably damper regions of Europe it has its origins in. Such expertise and foresight has resulted in Argentina being able to produce high quality wines of both red and white types, with Malbec, Bonarda and Cabernet Sauvignon dominating the vineyards for red wines, and Torrontés, Chardonnay and Chenin Blanc making up for most of the white wine produced there.