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Ashton Hills Vineyard Pinot Noir Reserve 2018 750ml

size
750ml
country
Australia
appellation
Mounty Lofty Ranges
subappellation
Adelaide Hills
94
JS
90
WA
Additional vintages
2018 2015
94
JS
Rated 94 by James Suckling
A deep nose with dark fruit and earth and undergrowth potential here. This is one to lay down. The palate has a long and silky wrap of fine yet dense tannin and a gently suave, smoothly delivered textural ride of sweet ripe cherries, red plums and blueberries. Excellent balance to boot. Drink from 2024. Screw cap. ... More details

Ashton Hills Vineyard Pinot Noir Reserve 2018 750ml

SKU 833171
Sale
$58.34
$56.14
/750ml bottle
Quantity
1
* This item is available for online ordering only. It can be picked up or shipped from our location within 4-6 business days. ?
Professional Ratings
94
JS
90
WA
94
JS
Rated 94 by James Suckling
A deep nose with dark fruit and earth and undergrowth potential here. This is one to lay down. The palate has a long and silky wrap of fine yet dense tannin and a gently suave, smoothly delivered textural ride of sweet ripe cherries, red plums and blueberries. Excellent balance to boot. Drink from 2024. Screw cap.
90
WA
Rated 90 by Wine Advocate
The cedar-scented 2018 Reserve Pinot Noir aged in 50% new French oak. Perhaps it's a bit much, but the wine does boast concentrated red fruit and a hint of mint under that oaky veneer. It's medium-bodied and silky in texture, with supple tannins that remain in the background, allowing the attractive strawberry and raspberry flavors to come through and the wine's seductive texture to shine on the finish.
Product Details
size
750ml
country
Australia
appellation
Mounty Lofty Ranges
subappellation
Adelaide Hills
Additional vintages
2018 2015
Overview
Rated 94 - A deep nose with dark fruit and earth and undergrowth potential here. This is one to lay down. The palate has a long and silky wrap of fine yet dense tannin and a gently suave, smoothly delivered textural ride of sweet ripe cherries, red plums and blueberries. Excellent balance to boot. Drink from 2024. Screw cap.
green-grapes.svg

Varietal: Pinot Noir

Regularly described as being the grape varietal responsible for producing the world's most romantic wines, Pinot Noir has long been associated with elegance and a broad range of flavors The name means 'black pine' in French, and this is due to the fact that the fruit of this particular varietal is especially dark in color, and hangs in a conical shape, like that of a pine cone. Despite being grown today in almost every wine producing country, Pinot Noir is a notoriously difficult grape variety to cultivate. This is because it is especially susceptible to various forms of mold and mildew, and thrives best in steady, cooler climates. However, the quality of the fruit has ensured that wineries and vintners have persevered with the varietal, and new technologies and methods have overcome many of the problems it presents. Alongside this, the wide popularity and enthusiasm for this grape has ensured it will remain a firm favorite amongst wine drinkers for many years to come.
barrel.svg

Region: South Australia

The vast region of South Australia is home to a wide variety of vineyards, growing a large range of different grape varietals. Because the South Australian wine region is so large, it benefits from a great array of climatic conditions – from dry and hot, to cool and windy – which wineries can use to their advantage when it comes to selecting the grape varietal they wish to thrive in a particular sub-region. South Australia is most commonly associated with the big, powerful and fruit-forward Shiraz wines which are produced in the cooler valley areas of the region, but recent decades have seen something of an explosion in the South Australian wine industry, leading to wineries expanding their repertoire enormously and experimenting with other fine grape varietals and making the most of their unique terroir.
field.svg

Country: Australia

Whilst most of Australia consists of arid deserts and dense bushland, the oceanic coasts to the south of the country have a terrain and climate ideal for vine cultivation and wine production. It took several decades of failed attempts at the end of the 18th century in order to produce vines of a decent enough quality for making wine, but since those first false starts, the Australian wine industry has continued to grow and grow. Today, wine production makes up for a considerable part of the Australian economy, with exports in recent years reaching unprecedented levels and even overtaking France for the first time ever. Whilst the greatest successes in regards to quality have been the result of the Syrah grape varietal (known locally as Shiraz), Australia utilizes several Old World grapes, and has had fantastic results from Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Riesling, Chardonnay and more. As the Australian passion for locally produced wine continues to develop, wineries have begun experimenting with a wider range of grape varietals, meaning that nowadays it isn't uncommon to find high quality Australian wines made from Petit Verdot, Sangiovese, Tempranillo and Viognier, amongst many others.
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More Details
green-grapes.svg

Varietal: Pinot Noir

Regularly described as being the grape varietal responsible for producing the world's most romantic wines, Pinot Noir has long been associated with elegance and a broad range of flavors The name means 'black pine' in French, and this is due to the fact that the fruit of this particular varietal is especially dark in color, and hangs in a conical shape, like that of a pine cone. Despite being grown today in almost every wine producing country, Pinot Noir is a notoriously difficult grape variety to cultivate. This is because it is especially susceptible to various forms of mold and mildew, and thrives best in steady, cooler climates. However, the quality of the fruit has ensured that wineries and vintners have persevered with the varietal, and new technologies and methods have overcome many of the problems it presents. Alongside this, the wide popularity and enthusiasm for this grape has ensured it will remain a firm favorite amongst wine drinkers for many years to come.
barrel.svg

Region: South Australia

The vast region of South Australia is home to a wide variety of vineyards, growing a large range of different grape varietals. Because the South Australian wine region is so large, it benefits from a great array of climatic conditions – from dry and hot, to cool and windy – which wineries can use to their advantage when it comes to selecting the grape varietal they wish to thrive in a particular sub-region. South Australia is most commonly associated with the big, powerful and fruit-forward Shiraz wines which are produced in the cooler valley areas of the region, but recent decades have seen something of an explosion in the South Australian wine industry, leading to wineries expanding their repertoire enormously and experimenting with other fine grape varietals and making the most of their unique terroir.
field.svg

Country: Australia

Whilst most of Australia consists of arid deserts and dense bushland, the oceanic coasts to the south of the country have a terrain and climate ideal for vine cultivation and wine production. It took several decades of failed attempts at the end of the 18th century in order to produce vines of a decent enough quality for making wine, but since those first false starts, the Australian wine industry has continued to grow and grow. Today, wine production makes up for a considerable part of the Australian economy, with exports in recent years reaching unprecedented levels and even overtaking France for the first time ever. Whilst the greatest successes in regards to quality have been the result of the Syrah grape varietal (known locally as Shiraz), Australia utilizes several Old World grapes, and has had fantastic results from Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Riesling, Chardonnay and more. As the Australian passion for locally produced wine continues to develop, wineries have begun experimenting with a wider range of grape varietals, meaning that nowadays it isn't uncommon to find high quality Australian wines made from Petit Verdot, Sangiovese, Tempranillo and Viognier, amongst many others.