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This wine is currently unavailable, the vintage 2021 is available

Badia A Coltibuono Chianti Classico 2020 750ml

size
750ml
country
Italy
region
Tuscany
appellation
Chianti Classico
DC
92
JS
92
Additional vintages
DC
92
Rated 92 by Decanter
From estate vineyards in southern reaches of Chianti Classico’s Vagliagli and Gaiole UGAs, Sangiovese is complemented by local varieties Canaiolo Nero, Ciliegiolo and Colorino. Following the hot summer, these were harvested in the last two weeks of September. The bright ruby hue is matched by equally lively aromas of medicinal herbs and roots suffused with red summer berries. Wild cherry and mint repeat on the palate. midweight and elegant, it is effortlessly balanced with crunchy acidity, light chalky tannins and digestible alcohol. Not a long ager but joyful – and so Sangiovese. ... More details
Image of bottle
Sample image only. Please see Item description for product Information. When ordering the item shipped will match the product listing if there are any discrepancies. Do not order solely on the label if you feel it does not match product description

Badia A Coltibuono Chianti Classico 2020 750ml

SKU 897814
Out of Stock
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More Details
green grapes

Varietal: Sangiovese

Sangiovese qualifies as one of the truly ancient grape varietals of the Old World, and whilst it is now grown in several countries across the globe, it very much remains a classic grape of Italian wine making. One of the key features of the Sangiovese grape varietal is that it can act as a 'sponge' of flavors when maturing in oak, taking on the earthy and vanilla tones present in the barrel. These dark grapes produce a wide variety of fine wines, from the lively and strawberry flavored young wines which are growing in popularity, to the complex, spicy and delicious aged wines which are treasured by drinkers and collectors worldwide. With a history which dates back to before the times of the Roman empire, Sangiovese will no doubt continue to be a favorite for wineries wishing to plant grapes which will guarantee quality, and will always attract wine lovers worldwide.
barrel

Region: Tuscany

The beautiful region of Tuscany has been associated with wine production for almost three thousand years, and as such is one of the oldest and most highly respected wine producing regions in the world. The hot, sunny climate supports quite a wide range of grapes, but the grape varietals most widely grown across this large region are Sangiovese and Vernaccia, both of which are used in the production of Tuscany's most distinctive red and white wines. Cabernet Sauvignon and other imported grape varietals have also flourished there for over two hundred years, but it wasn't until the 1970's and the rise of the 'Super Tuscans' that they were widely used, when the fine wineries of the region began experimenting with Bordeaux style red wines to great effect.
fields

Country: Italy

There are few countries in the world with a viticultural history as long or as illustrious as that claimed by Italy. Grapes were first being grown and cultivated on Italian soil several thousand years ago by the Greeks and the Pheonicians, who named Italy 'Oenotria' – the land of wines – so impressed were they with the climate and the suitability of the soil for wine production. Of course, it was the rise of the Roman Empire which had the most lasting influence on wine production in Italy, and their influence can still be felt today, as much of the riches of the empire came about through their enthusiasm for producing wines and exporting it to neighbouring countries. Since those times, a vast amount of Italian land has remained primarily for vine cultivation, and thousands of wineries can be found throughout the entire length and breadth of this beautiful country, drenched in Mediterranean sunshine and benefiting from the excellent fertile soils found there. Italy remains very much a 'land of wines', and one could not imagine this country, its landscape and culture, without it.