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Bodegas Breca Garnacha De Fuego 2014 750ml
SKU 776920
This wine is currently unavailable, the vintage 2015 is available

Bodegas Breca Garnacha De Fuego Grenache 2014

Calatayud - Aragon - Spain

Professional Wine Reviews for Bodegas Breca Garnacha De Fuego Grenache 2014

Rated 90 by Decanter
(aged in stainless steel and concrete tanks): Dark purple. Deeply pitched cherry, cassis and pipe tobacco aromas are brightened by floral and peppery spice qualities. Cherry compote and plum jam flavors coat the palate, with juicy acidity providing shape and back-end cut. Gains focus as well as depth with air and finishes sweet, smooth and quite long, with fine-grained tannins adding grip. Pretty serious in style for a Garnacha and a seriously great value as well. (Galloni)
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Other Vintages:
2015 2014 2013
Out of Stock
I've Had This
90 Decanter

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Additional Information on Bodegas Breca Garnacha De Fuego Grenache 2014

Winery Bodegas Breca

Varietal: Grenache

The purple skinned grapes of the Grenache varietal have quickly become one of the most widely planted red wine grapes in the world, flourishing in several countries which have the correct conditions in which they can grow to ripeness. They thrive anywhere with a dry, hot climate, such as that found in central Spain and other such arid areas, and produce delightfully light bodied wines full of spicy flavors and notes of dark berries. Their robustness and relative vigor has led them being a favorite grape varietal for wineries all over the world, and whilst it isn't uncommon to see bottles made from this varietal alone, they are also regularly used as a blending grape due to their high sugar content and ability to produce wines containing a relatively high level of alcohol.

Country: Spain

Ever since the Phoenicians and Romans brought their knowledge of vine cultivation to Spanish soils, the country's culture has grown alongside wine production, with wine being a vital part of Spanish identity and Spanish traditions. Each region of Spain has a wine quite distinct from the others, and it is produced by smallholders and families as much as it is by large companies and established wineries. From the relatively mild and lush regions of La Rioja to the arid plateaus that surround Madrid, grapes are grown in abundance for the now booming Spanish wine industry, and new laws and regulations have recently been put in place to keep the country's standards high. By combining traditional practices with modern technology, Spanish wineries are continuing to produce distinctive wines of great character, flavor and aroma, with the focus shifting in recent decades to quality over quantity.