Chateau Brane-Cantenac Margaux 2011 750ml

size
750ml
country
France
region
Bordeaux
appellation
Margaux
93
WE
93
DC
92
JS
91
WA
90
WS
89
VM
Additional vintages
93
WE
Rated 93 by Wine Enthusiast
This serious estate has made a fine 2011 wine. While deep and ripe with blackberry flavor and acidity, it also has dense structure. It shows both power and style, with notes of wood aging likely to fade. Drink this fine wine from 2017. ... More details
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Chateau Brane-Cantenac Margaux 2011 750ml

SKU 842678
$79.74
/750ml bottle
Quantity
* This item is available for online ordering only. It can be picked up or shipped from our location within 4-6 business days. ?
Professional Ratings
93
WE
93
DC
92
JS
91
WA
90
WS
89
VM
93
WE
Rated 93 by Wine Enthusiast
This serious estate has made a fine 2011 wine. While deep and ripe with blackberry flavor and acidity, it also has dense structure. It shows both power and style, with notes of wood aging likely to fade. Drink this fine wine from 2017.
93
DC
Rated 93 by Decanter
This is a great example of how 2011 is evolving. There's a softness and grace to the fruit that was perhaps not expected in the austere early years - and even during a tasting I did of this wine in late 2017. Today, it's starting to open up, with an emphasis of rose petals and light spices that give the appellation signature but in a less concentrated form than, say, 2010 or 2015. It's enjoyable and good quality, a welcoming bottle that has plenty of complexity to get hold of, and tannins that suggest there's still a long way to go. It speaks of the success of Brane Cantenac in recent years. 0.5% Carmenère completes the blend. 39% of production. Drinking Window 2020 - 2038.
92
JS
Rated 92 by James Suckling
There is a beautiful clarity of fruit to this wine, with cherries, raspberries and flowers on the nose and palate. Full body, fine tannins and a fresh finish. Crisp and delicious. Extremely well done for the vintage. Try in 2018.
91
WA
Rated 91 by Wine Advocate
Tasted at the Brane-Cantenac vertical at the château, the 2011 Brane-Cantenac is a blend of 37% Merlot, 6% Cabernet Franc, 56.5% Cabernet Sauvignon and a pinch of Carmenère. It has a more attractive bouquet than the 2012, demonstrating more complexity and fruit intensity: blackberry and raspberry, a touch of cedar and tobacco thrown into the mix. The palate is medium-bodied with fine tannin, the oak beautifully interwoven into the brambly red berry fruit, gently building with a hint of spice and dry tobacco on the finish. There is just a tad more substance than the 2012, yet it remains elegant, and given the vintage it is sophisticated compared to others this vintage. Tasted April 2015.
90
WS
Rated 90 by Wine Spectator
Offers a pretty, dusty edge, with lightly mulled cherry and plum notes, stitched with floral hints and a touch of singed sandalwood. Shows good flesh through the finish, with a pebbly backdrop. Best from 2016 through 2026. 8,330 cases made.
89
VM
Rated 89 by Vinous Media
The 2011 Brane-Cantenac has a rather austere tobacco and earth bouquet, less cedary than I have observed with previous bottles and maybe more closed. The palate is much more promising, offering fine tannin, palpable energy and sorbet-fresh red berry fruit laced with cedar and pencil lead. It does not have the power or concentration of the previous two vintages, but it certainly delivers precision and typicité. Tasted at the Brane-Cantenac vertical at the château.
Product Details
size
750ml
country
France
region
Bordeaux
appellation
Margaux
Additional vintages
Overview
Rated 93 - This is a great example of how 2011 is evolving. There's a softness and grace to the fruit that was perhaps not expected in the austere early years - and even during a tasting I did of this wine in late 2017. Today, it's starting to open up, with an emphasis of rose petals and light spices that give the appellation signature but in a less concentrated form than, say, 2010 or 2015. It's enjoyable and good quality, a welcoming bottle that has plenty of complexity to get hold of, and tannins that suggest there's still a long way to go. It speaks of the success of Brane Cantenac in recent years. 0.5% Carmenère completes the blend. 39% of production. Drinking Window 2020 - 2038.
barrel

Vintage: 2011

The year 2011 was an interesting year for many northern and central European countries, as the weather was more than unpredictable in the spring and summer. However, in most countries, the climatic conditions thankfully settled down in the late summer and fall. The result of this slightly difficult year of weather in France was a set of surprisingly small yields, but overall, these yields were of a higher quality than those harvested in certain previous years. A fantastic set of wines was also made in Italy and Spain, and the Rioja wines - when released - are set to be very good indeed. Austria also had superb year in 2011, with almost fifty percent more grapes being grown and used for their distinctive Gruner Veltliner wines than in the year before. Possibly the European country which had the finest 2011, though, was Portugal, with wineries in the Douro region claiming this year to be one of the best in decades for the production of Port wine, and the bright, young Vinho Verdes wines. In the New World, the Pacific Northwest saw some of the best weather of 2011, and Washington State and Oregon reportedly had a highly successful year, especially for the cultivation of high quality red wine grapes. Chile and Argentina had a relatively cool year, which certainly helped retain the character of many of their key grape varietals, and should make for some exciting drinking. South Africa had especially good weather for their white wine grape varietals, particularly Chardonnay and Sauvignon Blanc, and many South African wineries are reporting 2011 as one of their best years in recent memory.
green grapes

Varietal: Red Bordeaux

The Bordeaux region of France consistently enjoys the reputation of being the finest region for wine making in the world. But what is it that makes this area around the Gironde river so special? The secret lies in their ancient and careful blend of no more than six high quality, flavorful and unique grape varietals. Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Petit Verdot, Cabernet Franc, Malbec and Carménere are all permitted for usage in the production of Bordeaux wines, and the winery carefully considers how to balance the fine points of one varietal against another. Most commonly, Cabernet Sauvignon is used as the main grape varietal, usually with vintners making wines containing upwards of 60% Cabernet Sauvignon grape juices. This varietal lends its big, spicy, fruity flavors and astringent, tannin-heavy character to the mix. Normally, this strong varietal is then tempered and rounded by Merlot, a fleshy, fruity and far lighter bodied grape, containing far fewer tannins and a much brighter flavor The blended wines are normally left to age in oak, where they can continue to work together and produce their wonderful results.
barrel

Region: Bordeaux

The wineries of Bordeaux in France are widely considered to be amongst the finest on earth, with many of the chateaux found on the Left Bank and in the Médoc region routinely demanding enormous prices and being snapped up by collectors looking to add the best examples of the world's white and red wines to their cellars. Bordeaux's secret to success comes from the fact that the terroir of the region is exceptionally rich in minerals, helped by the clay and gravel soils which typify the area and the Gironde river which runs through it. Normally humid in climate, the nearby Atlantic coast supplies cooling breezes, making Bordeaux a winemaker's dream and resulting in extremely high quality grape varietals. For hundreds of years, the wineries of Bordeaux have been mastering the art of wine blending, and today produce a wide range of wine styles using many of the sixteen grape varietals permitted to grow in the region by French law.
fields

Country: France

It is widely understood and accepted that the finest wines in the world come out of France. Whether you are drinking a vintage bottle from one of the famed Grand Cru wineries of Bordeaux - such as Chateau Margaux or Chateau Lafite-Rothschild - or a more simple and affordable bottle from one of the lesser known appellations in Burgundy, the likelihood is that the wine is packed full of intense and interesting flavors, and has a fine, balanced structure typical of almost all French produce. This reputation for excellence is taken extremely serious by the French, with dozens of regularly updated laws and regulations ensuring the quality and accurate labeling of wines. Such dedication and passion for fine wine, representative of the region in which it is produced, means customers can be assured that when they buy a bottle from France, they are buying something almost certain to please and delight.
bottle and glass

Appellation: Margaux

The appellation of Margaux in Bordeaux's Médoc is historically one of the world's most important and highly respected wine regions. Margaux has been producing wines of the most extraordinary quality for centuries, and has a history of prestige and fame brought about by the supreme flavors and aromas carried within its deep, beautiful and elegant blended red wines. The wineries of Margaux benefit enormously from the hot sunshine the region receives, as well as the mineral rich gravelly soils the Gironde river deposits. This all allows the wine-makers to grow red Bordeaux grapes of the highest quality, which express all of the best features of their precious terroir, and result in wonderful wines of real distinction, superb flavor and a wide bouquet of complex, elegant aromas.
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More Details
barrel

Vintage: 2011

The year 2011 was an interesting year for many northern and central European countries, as the weather was more than unpredictable in the spring and summer. However, in most countries, the climatic conditions thankfully settled down in the late summer and fall. The result of this slightly difficult year of weather in France was a set of surprisingly small yields, but overall, these yields were of a higher quality than those harvested in certain previous years. A fantastic set of wines was also made in Italy and Spain, and the Rioja wines - when released - are set to be very good indeed. Austria also had superb year in 2011, with almost fifty percent more grapes being grown and used for their distinctive Gruner Veltliner wines than in the year before. Possibly the European country which had the finest 2011, though, was Portugal, with wineries in the Douro region claiming this year to be one of the best in decades for the production of Port wine, and the bright, young Vinho Verdes wines. In the New World, the Pacific Northwest saw some of the best weather of 2011, and Washington State and Oregon reportedly had a highly successful year, especially for the cultivation of high quality red wine grapes. Chile and Argentina had a relatively cool year, which certainly helped retain the character of many of their key grape varietals, and should make for some exciting drinking. South Africa had especially good weather for their white wine grape varietals, particularly Chardonnay and Sauvignon Blanc, and many South African wineries are reporting 2011 as one of their best years in recent memory.
green grapes

Varietal: Red Bordeaux

The Bordeaux region of France consistently enjoys the reputation of being the finest region for wine making in the world. But what is it that makes this area around the Gironde river so special? The secret lies in their ancient and careful blend of no more than six high quality, flavorful and unique grape varietals. Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Petit Verdot, Cabernet Franc, Malbec and Carménere are all permitted for usage in the production of Bordeaux wines, and the winery carefully considers how to balance the fine points of one varietal against another. Most commonly, Cabernet Sauvignon is used as the main grape varietal, usually with vintners making wines containing upwards of 60% Cabernet Sauvignon grape juices. This varietal lends its big, spicy, fruity flavors and astringent, tannin-heavy character to the mix. Normally, this strong varietal is then tempered and rounded by Merlot, a fleshy, fruity and far lighter bodied grape, containing far fewer tannins and a much brighter flavor The blended wines are normally left to age in oak, where they can continue to work together and produce their wonderful results.
barrel

Region: Bordeaux

The wineries of Bordeaux in France are widely considered to be amongst the finest on earth, with many of the chateaux found on the Left Bank and in the Médoc region routinely demanding enormous prices and being snapped up by collectors looking to add the best examples of the world's white and red wines to their cellars. Bordeaux's secret to success comes from the fact that the terroir of the region is exceptionally rich in minerals, helped by the clay and gravel soils which typify the area and the Gironde river which runs through it. Normally humid in climate, the nearby Atlantic coast supplies cooling breezes, making Bordeaux a winemaker's dream and resulting in extremely high quality grape varietals. For hundreds of years, the wineries of Bordeaux have been mastering the art of wine blending, and today produce a wide range of wine styles using many of the sixteen grape varietals permitted to grow in the region by French law.
fields

Country: France

It is widely understood and accepted that the finest wines in the world come out of France. Whether you are drinking a vintage bottle from one of the famed Grand Cru wineries of Bordeaux - such as Chateau Margaux or Chateau Lafite-Rothschild - or a more simple and affordable bottle from one of the lesser known appellations in Burgundy, the likelihood is that the wine is packed full of intense and interesting flavors, and has a fine, balanced structure typical of almost all French produce. This reputation for excellence is taken extremely serious by the French, with dozens of regularly updated laws and regulations ensuring the quality and accurate labeling of wines. Such dedication and passion for fine wine, representative of the region in which it is produced, means customers can be assured that when they buy a bottle from France, they are buying something almost certain to please and delight.
bottle and glass

Appellation: Margaux

The appellation of Margaux in Bordeaux's Médoc is historically one of the world's most important and highly respected wine regions. Margaux has been producing wines of the most extraordinary quality for centuries, and has a history of prestige and fame brought about by the supreme flavors and aromas carried within its deep, beautiful and elegant blended red wines. The wineries of Margaux benefit enormously from the hot sunshine the region receives, as well as the mineral rich gravelly soils the Gironde river deposits. This all allows the wine-makers to grow red Bordeaux grapes of the highest quality, which express all of the best features of their precious terroir, and result in wonderful wines of real distinction, superb flavor and a wide bouquet of complex, elegant aromas.