Cirillo Grenache Old Vine 1850 2010 750ml
SKU 779772

Cirillo Grenache Old Vine 1850 2010

Cirillo - Barossa - Australia - Barossa Valley

Professional Wine Reviews for Cirillo Grenache Old Vine 1850 2010

Rated 93 by Decanter
This is one very, very old plot of grenache on sandy soils in the heart of the Vine Vale district of the Barossa Valley. Cirillo has meticulously hand-reared these ancient beauties to deliver an immensely powerful, age-worthy expression of grenache. Mellow woody notes frame up deep raspberry and blackberry fruits, cassis and wild herbs too; very powerful and very composed on the palate, low center of gravity, muscular, essence-like and long swirling tannins weave tight through the finish. Drink in 2018. (Suckling)

Additional information »

12 Bottle
Check availability
Add 12 more to get fixed rate shipping

I've Had This
93 Decanter

More wines available from Cirillo

Cirillo Grenache Old Vine 1850 2010 Customer Reviews

Product Rating  

There have been no reviews for this product. Be first to .

Additional Information on Cirillo Grenache Old Vine 1850 2010

Winery: Cirillo

Vintage: 2010

2010 saw extremely high quality viticulture in many parts of the world, with an exceptionally long and hot summer providing huge benefits for wineries across many countries, especially in the southern hemisphere. The northern hemisphere and Europe saw something of a cooler summer and flowering period, but this was by no means as disastrous as it could have been. France, especially, had a fantastic year in 2010, with the world renowned Burgundy region proclaiming that their white wines of this year are ones to look out for, and despite yields being relatively small across much of the country, the quality was exceptionally high. Spain, too, received some cooler weather, but Rioja and the rest of central Spain are hailing 2010 as a very good year indeed, again as a result of smaller, finer yields. California also received similar climatic conditions, but again, wineries are highly positive about the overall effect this had on their produce, as the slightly challenging conditions resulted in smaller yields of much elegance and distinction. 2010 was really Australia's year, and in South Australia and across the Mornington Peninsula, Chardonnay vines produced good yields with a lower sugar level than in previous years. As such, the majority of South Australian white wines from 2010 are superb, and packed full of character. Shiraz also had a great year, and most Australian wineries have been proclaiming 2010 one of the great vintages. Both the Argentinian and Chilean wine industries benefited from some ideal climatic conditions this year, and are reportedly ecstatically pleased with the fact that their 2010 wines ended up with lower alcohol levels, and were beautifully balanced wines packed full of flavor.

Varietal: Grenache

For many centuries now, vintners in the dry and arid regions of Europe have been growing the purple skinned fruits of the Grenache vines for use in a wide range of different wines. Their influence and popularity led to them being planted all over the New World in any region with the correct climatic conditions for them to thrive in, away from the damp or wet weather which causes this particular varietal to very easily rot. Grenache grapes are prized by many as a result of their spicy berry flavors, and the fact that they have a relatively high alcohol content in the bottle. This has led to them being often used as a blending grape, although single variety bottles are also common and make the most of their light body and interesting, rich flavors

Region: Barossa

The Barossa Valley in Australia is one of the New World's most interesting wine regions, having been established in the late 19th century by German settlers. The region benefits enormously from the relatively temperate climate, which ranges from being hot on the lower parts of the valley, to quite cool as the altitude increases on the valley slopes. Barossa Valley produces mostly Shiraz wines, and has become one of the key Australian regions for this distinctive grape varietal which has gone on to be a major grape for the Australian wine industry. Despite suffering from a poor reputation in the mid 20th century, by the 1980s, plenty of unique and forward-thinking wineries set up in Barossa to take advantage of its excellent climate, and set about producing the excellent red and white wines which the region is famed for today.

Country: Australia

Whilst most of Australia consists of arid deserts and dense bushland, the oceanic coasts to the south of the country have a terrain and climate ideal for vine cultivation and wine production. It took several decades of failed attempts at the end of the 18th century in order to produce vines of a decent enough quality for making wine, but since those first false starts, the Australian wine industry has continued to grow and grow. Today, wine production makes up for a considerable part of the Australian economy, with exports in recent years reaching unprecedented levels and even overtaking France for the first time ever. Whilst the greatest successes in regards to quality have been the result of the Syrah grape varietal (known locally as Shiraz), Australia utilizes several Old World grapes, and has had fantastic results from Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Riesling, Chardonnay and more. As the Australian passion for locally produced wine continues to develop, wineries have begun experimenting with a wider range of grape varietals, meaning that nowadays it isn't uncommon to find high quality Australian wines made from Petit Verdot, Sangiovese, Tempranillo and Viognier, amongst many others.