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This wine is currently unavailable, the vintage 2017 is available

Emeritus Pinot Noir Hallberg Ranch 2013 750ml

size
750ml
country
United States
region
California
appellation
Sonoma Valley
subappellation
Russian River Valley
WS
88
Additional vintages
WS
88
Rated 88 by Wine Spectator
Tight and compact, with a dense core of crushed rock, plum and cherry, and touches of herb, spice and tobacco, this is both complex and restrained, and a good candidate for short-term cellaring.
Image of bottle
Sample image only. Please see Item description for product Information. When ordering the item shipped will match the product listing if there are any discrepancies. Do not order solely on the label if you feel it does not match product description

Emeritus Pinot Noir Hallberg Ranch 2013 750ml

SKU 777624
Out of Stock
More wines available from Emeritus
Sale
(750ml)
Bottle: $40.55 $43.60
This 2017 vintage from Hallberg Ranch is characterized by a fruit outburst and mild acidity. The wine is extroverted,...
More Details
Winery Emeritus
green grapes

Varietal: Pinot Noir

Pinot Noir translates as 'black pine' in French, and is named as such due to the extremely inky color of the fruits, which hang in bunches the shape of a pine cone. Wineries often struggle with Pinot Noir vines, as more than most red wine grape varietals, they fail in hot temperatures and are rather susceptible to various diseases which can be disastrous when hoping for a late harvest. Thanks to new technologies and methods for avoiding such problems, however, the Pinot Noir grape varietal has spread across the world to almost every major wine producing country. Why? Quite simply because this is considered to be one of the finest grape varietals one can cultivate, due to the fact that it can be used to produce a wide range of excellent wines full of interesting, fresh and fascinating flavors Their thin skins result in a fairly light-bodied wine, and the juices carry beautiful notes of summer fruits, currants and berries, and many, many more.
barrel

Region: California

Since the 18th century, California has been a hugely important and influential wine region, acting as a trailblazer for other New World wine regions and utilizing an important blend of traditional and contemporary practices, methods and techniques relating to their wine production. Split into four key areas – the North Coast, the Central Coast, the South Coast and the Central Valley – Californian wineries make the most of their ideal climate and rich variety of terrains in order to produce a fascinating range of wines made with a long list of different fine grape varietals. Today, the state has almost half a million acres under vine, and is one of the world's largest wine exporters, with Californian wines being drunk and enjoyed all across the globe.
fields

Country: United States

Whilst there are several strains of native grape varietals in the United States, it was the introduction of the European species which prompted the country to begin producing wines on a large scale. Over the past few centuries, experimentation and cross-breeding has produced great successes in regards to the quality and suitability of the fruit grown in states such as California, Oregon, Washington and New York, and the past few decades have seen New World wines from the United States reach much higher standards. Arguably the finest United States wines have always come out of California, where the climate and terrroir is most suitable for fine wine production. The masterful blending of classic grape varietals such as Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot, amongst others including Syrah and Chardonnay, have had world beating results in recent years, prompting many to suggest that there has never been a better time for buying and drinking United States wines.
bottle and glass

Appellation: Sonoma Valley

Since the 1850s, Sonoma Valley has been recognized as one of the United States' most important and productive wine regions. Any visitor to the region will quickly understand just why Sonoma Valley has had so much success over the past hundred and fifty years, as the region benefits enormously from the wonderfully hot and dry climate it receives, alongside mineral rich soils, geological features such as thermal springs. Furthermore, the region has a rich wine heritage which gives the region a sense of pride and a determination to consistently put quality above quantity, and to make the most of the wide array of red and white wine grape varietals which flourish there. The Valley of the Moon, as it is affectionately named, is now widely understood to be home to many of North America's finest wines, and this is set to continue for many years to come.