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Mastroberardino Aglianico Redimore 2019 750ml

size
750ml
country
Italy
region
Campania
appellation
Irpinia
VM
92
Additional vintages
VM
92
Rated 92 by Vinous Media
Crushed stone gives way to sweet exotic spices, then hints of curry, and finally crushed blackberries and plums as the 2019 Irpinia Aglianico Re di More comes to life in the glass. This is silky and polished upon entry, gaining depths through mineral-tinged black fruits, savory herbs and rosy inner florals that form toward the close. Seamless from start to finish, the Re di More tapers off with a concentration of tart raspberries and hints of violet pastille that last incredibly long. This suave expression of pure Aglianico is going to win a lot of hearts. You get a little bit of new barrique spice, and it’s wonderfully integrated. This drinks like a baby Taurasi, but it’s much more accessible. ... More details
Image of bottle
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Mastroberardino Aglianico Redimore 2019 750ml

SKU 869675
Out of Stock
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green grapes

Varietal: Aglianico

Aglianico is a black skinned grape most commonly associated with the exquisite wines of the Campania region of Italy. It thrives most happily in hot and dry climates, and as such, has had plenty of success in the New World, particularly in the United States, where it is used to great effect in many red wines. It was believed to come from Greece several thousand years ago, brought by Pheonician tradesman, and was wildly popular in Roman times, when it was used in the finest wines made by the Roman empire. Aglianico grapes produce full bodied red wines which have a high tannin and acid content. As such, it has excellent ageing potential, and with a standard amount of time in a barrel, it rounds out and mellows to produce beautifully balanced wines.
barrel

Region: Campania

Campania may well be Italy's oldest wine region, with a history which spans over three thousand years and has endured throughout the rising and falling of empires. Today, the region's wine industry is as strong as ever, and consistently producing excellent wines of character and distinction, thanks to the dedication the wineries of Campania have for quality over quantity, and the love they have for their traditions and time honored practices. Of course, the region is helped enormously by the ideal climatic conditions it receives on the west coast of Italy, and the fact that the soils of Campania could be amongst the finest on earth for viticulture. For thousands of years, Campania has been the beating heart of the Italian wine industry, and this is one thing which is unlikely to change any time soon.
fields

Country: Italy

There are few countries in the world with a viticultural history as long or as illustrious as that claimed by Italy. Grapes were first being grown and cultivated on Italian soil several thousand years ago by the Greeks and the Pheonicians, who named Italy 'Oenotria' – the land of wines – so impressed were they with the climate and the suitability of the soil for wine production. Of course, it was the rise of the Roman Empire which had the most lasting influence on wine production in Italy, and their influence can still be felt today, as much of the riches of the empire came about through their enthusiasm for producing wines and exporting it to neighbouring countries. Since those times, a vast amount of Italian land has remained primarily for vine cultivation, and thousands of wineries can be found throughout the entire length and breadth of this beautiful country, drenched in Mediterranean sunshine and benefiting from the excellent fertile soils found there. Italy remains very much a 'land of wines', and one could not imagine this country, its landscape and culture, without it.