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Nqn Malma Chardonnay Reserva De Familia 2021 750ml

size
750ml
country
Argentina
region
Patagonia
JS
91
JS
91
Rated 91 by James Suckling
Aromas of yellow apples and mangoes with hints of almonds, caramel, dried flowers and crushed stones. Medium- to full-bodied with juicy acidity and a sleek, polished mouthfeel. Round and fruit-forward. Drink now.
Image of bottle
Sample image only. Please see Item description for product Information. When ordering the item shipped will match the product listing if there are any discrepancies. Do not order solely on the label if you feel it does not match product description

Nqn Malma Chardonnay Reserva De Familia 2021 750ml

SKU 924213
$15.75
/750ml bottle
Quantity
* This item is available for online ordering only. It can be picked up or shipped from our location within 4-6 business days. ?
Professional Ratings
JS
91
JS
91
Rated 91 by James Suckling
Aromas of yellow apples and mangoes with hints of almonds, caramel, dried flowers and crushed stones. Medium- to full-bodied with juicy acidity and a sleek, polished mouthfeel. Round and fruit-forward. Drink now.
Product Details
size
750ml
country
Argentina
region
Patagonia
Overview
Aromas of yellow apples and mangoes with hints of almonds, caramel, dried flowers and crushed stones. Medium- to full-bodied with juicy acidity and a sleek, polished mouthfeel. Round and fruit-forward. Drink now.
green grapes

Varietal: Chardonnay

Of all the white wine grape varietals, surely the one which has spread the furthest and is most widely appreciated is the Chardonnay. This green skinned grape is now grown all over the Old and New Worlds, from New Zealand to the Americas, from England to Chile, and is one of the first varietals people think of when considering white wine grapes. Perhaps this is because of its huge popularity which reached a peak in the 1990s, thanks to new technologies combining with traditional methods to bring the very best features out of the Chardonnay grape, and allow its unique qualities to shine through. Most fine Chardonnay wines use a process known as malolactic fermentation, wherein the malic acids in the grape juice are converted to lactic acids, allowing a creamier, buttery nature to come forward in the wine. No grape varietal is better suited to this process than Chardonnay, which manages to balance these silky, creamy notes with fresh white fruit flavors beautifully.
barrel

Region: Patagonia

When it comes to Patagonia, one would be forgiven for expressing surprise at the region's ever growing and successful wine industry. Cold, dry and comparatively flat, this low altitude region of South America has been inhabited for a couple of centuries by an eclectic mix of European settlers, who, over time, began planting vineyards of grapes imported from their native lands. Despite the conditions being less than favorable for viticulture, vintners are helped by some unusual weather phenomenons, and generations of expertise and perseverance. Today, the wine industry of Patagonia is doing well, with several Old World grape varietals thriving there. Whilst the red wines of the region - made commonly with Pinot Noir and Malbec grapes - are highly regarded, it is the white wines which impress the most on the world stage, and it is likely Patagonia will continue to grow as an important New World wine region over the next few decades.
fields

Country: Argentina

Anyone who has been the Mendoza area of Argentina may be surprised to find that this is one of the primary wine regions of the country, now comfortably sitting as the fifth largest producer of wine in the world. The Mendoza is an incredibly dry and arid desert, which receives as little as two hundred millimeters of rainfall per year, and supports very little life at all. We can thank the ancient technologies of the Huarpes Indians for Argentina's current booming wine trade, as they managed to irrigate the region by digging channels from the Mendoza river, thus creating an area which had enough access to water with which to grow vines. Not only this, but the grape which Argentina primarily uses for their wines – Malbec – actually flourishes in such conditions, as it is less likely to suffer from the rot it so often finds in the considerably damper regions of Europe it has its origins in. Such expertise and foresight has resulted in Argentina being able to produce high quality wines of both red and white types, with Malbec, Bonarda and Cabernet Sauvignon dominating the vineyards for red wines, and Torrontés, Chardonnay and Chenin Blanc making up for most of the white wine produced there.
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More Details
Winery Nqn
green grapes

Varietal: Chardonnay

Of all the white wine grape varietals, surely the one which has spread the furthest and is most widely appreciated is the Chardonnay. This green skinned grape is now grown all over the Old and New Worlds, from New Zealand to the Americas, from England to Chile, and is one of the first varietals people think of when considering white wine grapes. Perhaps this is because of its huge popularity which reached a peak in the 1990s, thanks to new technologies combining with traditional methods to bring the very best features out of the Chardonnay grape, and allow its unique qualities to shine through. Most fine Chardonnay wines use a process known as malolactic fermentation, wherein the malic acids in the grape juice are converted to lactic acids, allowing a creamier, buttery nature to come forward in the wine. No grape varietal is better suited to this process than Chardonnay, which manages to balance these silky, creamy notes with fresh white fruit flavors beautifully.
barrel

Region: Patagonia

When it comes to Patagonia, one would be forgiven for expressing surprise at the region's ever growing and successful wine industry. Cold, dry and comparatively flat, this low altitude region of South America has been inhabited for a couple of centuries by an eclectic mix of European settlers, who, over time, began planting vineyards of grapes imported from their native lands. Despite the conditions being less than favorable for viticulture, vintners are helped by some unusual weather phenomenons, and generations of expertise and perseverance. Today, the wine industry of Patagonia is doing well, with several Old World grape varietals thriving there. Whilst the red wines of the region - made commonly with Pinot Noir and Malbec grapes - are highly regarded, it is the white wines which impress the most on the world stage, and it is likely Patagonia will continue to grow as an important New World wine region over the next few decades.
fields

Country: Argentina

Anyone who has been the Mendoza area of Argentina may be surprised to find that this is one of the primary wine regions of the country, now comfortably sitting as the fifth largest producer of wine in the world. The Mendoza is an incredibly dry and arid desert, which receives as little as two hundred millimeters of rainfall per year, and supports very little life at all. We can thank the ancient technologies of the Huarpes Indians for Argentina's current booming wine trade, as they managed to irrigate the region by digging channels from the Mendoza river, thus creating an area which had enough access to water with which to grow vines. Not only this, but the grape which Argentina primarily uses for their wines – Malbec – actually flourishes in such conditions, as it is less likely to suffer from the rot it so often finds in the considerably damper regions of Europe it has its origins in. Such expertise and foresight has resulted in Argentina being able to produce high quality wines of both red and white types, with Malbec, Bonarda and Cabernet Sauvignon dominating the vineyards for red wines, and Torrontés, Chardonnay and Chenin Blanc making up for most of the white wine produced there.