Nqn Malma Extra Brut NV 750ml

size
750ml
country
Argentina
region
Patagonia
JS
90
JS
90
Rated 90 by James Suckling
A balanced sparkling wine with sliced pear, strawberry and light bread dough. Medium body, fine bead and a fresh finish. Drink now. A blend of 70% pinot noir and 30% chardonnay.
Image of bottle
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Nqn Malma Extra Brut NV 750ml

SKU 774482
$13.74
/750ml bottle
Quantity
* This item is available for online ordering only. It can be picked up or shipped from our location within 4-6 business days. ?
Professional Ratings
JS
90
JS
90
Rated 90 by James Suckling
A balanced sparkling wine with sliced pear, strawberry and light bread dough. Medium body, fine bead and a fresh finish. Drink now. A blend of 70% pinot noir and 30% chardonnay.
Product Details
size
750ml
country
Argentina
region
Patagonia
Overview
Rated 90 - A balanced sparkling wine with sliced pear, strawberry and light bread dough. Medium body, fine bead and a fresh finish. Drink now. A blend of 70% pinot noir and 30% chardonnay.
green grapes

Varietal: Champagne Blend

Whilst Champagne sparkling wines are most commonly made with a blend of Chardonnay, Pinot Noir and Pinot Meunier grape varietals, there are actually seven fine grape varietals allowed by French wine law for inclusion in the wines of this region. These include Arbanne, Pinot Gris, Pinot Blanc and and Petit Meslier alongside the others, although these four are being used less and less in the modern age. Champagnes are normally blended wines, although the popularity of single variety 'blanc de blanc' Champagnes made solely with Chardonnay grapes, and 'blanc de noir' wines made only with Pinot Noir varietal grapes are becoming more and more popular. The blending process found in most Champagnes aims to take the finest points of each grape varietal and bring them together to produce spectacular, strong yet balanced results in the bottle.
barrel

Region: Patagonia

Patagonia is a rather fascinating and somewhat unlikely New World wine region. Despite being mostly in Argentina, it bears little to no resemblance whatsoever to the more famous Argentinian region of Cuyo, being instead at a low altitude, much further south, and considerably colder. However, unusual weather conditions, and a benevolent mountain wind known as 'La Zonda' help wineries in Patagonia produce highly characterful wines, which generally have far more in common with traditionally French and German wines than their New World counterparts. Riesling, Pinot Noir and Chardonnay, amongst others, all grow very well in this chilly and windswept place, helped by the mineral rich soils and the expertise of the vintners, many of whom have been working the land of Patagonia for several generations.
fields

Country: Argentina

Anyone who has been the Mendoza area of Argentina may be surprised to find that this is one of the primary wine regions of the country, now comfortably sitting as the fifth largest producer of wine in the world. The Mendoza is an incredibly dry and arid desert, which receives as little as two hundred millimeters of rainfall per year, and supports very little life at all. We can thank the ancient technologies of the Huarpes Indians for Argentina's current booming wine trade, as they managed to irrigate the region by digging channels from the Mendoza river, thus creating an area which had enough access to water with which to grow vines. Not only this, but the grape which Argentina primarily uses for their wines – Malbec – actually flourishes in such conditions, as it is less likely to suffer from the rot it so often finds in the considerably damper regions of Europe it has its origins in. Such expertise and foresight has resulted in Argentina being able to produce high quality wines of both red and white types, with Malbec, Bonarda and Cabernet Sauvignon dominating the vineyards for red wines, and Torrontés, Chardonnay and Chenin Blanc making up for most of the white wine produced there.
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green grapes

Varietal: Champagne Blend

Whilst Champagne sparkling wines are most commonly made with a blend of Chardonnay, Pinot Noir and Pinot Meunier grape varietals, there are actually seven fine grape varietals allowed by French wine law for inclusion in the wines of this region. These include Arbanne, Pinot Gris, Pinot Blanc and and Petit Meslier alongside the others, although these four are being used less and less in the modern age. Champagnes are normally blended wines, although the popularity of single variety 'blanc de blanc' Champagnes made solely with Chardonnay grapes, and 'blanc de noir' wines made only with Pinot Noir varietal grapes are becoming more and more popular. The blending process found in most Champagnes aims to take the finest points of each grape varietal and bring them together to produce spectacular, strong yet balanced results in the bottle.
barrel

Region: Patagonia

Patagonia is a rather fascinating and somewhat unlikely New World wine region. Despite being mostly in Argentina, it bears little to no resemblance whatsoever to the more famous Argentinian region of Cuyo, being instead at a low altitude, much further south, and considerably colder. However, unusual weather conditions, and a benevolent mountain wind known as 'La Zonda' help wineries in Patagonia produce highly characterful wines, which generally have far more in common with traditionally French and German wines than their New World counterparts. Riesling, Pinot Noir and Chardonnay, amongst others, all grow very well in this chilly and windswept place, helped by the mineral rich soils and the expertise of the vintners, many of whom have been working the land of Patagonia for several generations.
fields

Country: Argentina

Anyone who has been the Mendoza area of Argentina may be surprised to find that this is one of the primary wine regions of the country, now comfortably sitting as the fifth largest producer of wine in the world. The Mendoza is an incredibly dry and arid desert, which receives as little as two hundred millimeters of rainfall per year, and supports very little life at all. We can thank the ancient technologies of the Huarpes Indians for Argentina's current booming wine trade, as they managed to irrigate the region by digging channels from the Mendoza river, thus creating an area which had enough access to water with which to grow vines. Not only this, but the grape which Argentina primarily uses for their wines – Malbec – actually flourishes in such conditions, as it is less likely to suffer from the rot it so often finds in the considerably damper regions of Europe it has its origins in. Such expertise and foresight has resulted in Argentina being able to produce high quality wines of both red and white types, with Malbec, Bonarda and Cabernet Sauvignon dominating the vineyards for red wines, and Torrontés, Chardonnay and Chenin Blanc making up for most of the white wine produced there.