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Pewsey Vale Riesling The Contours Museum Reserve 2013 750ml

size
750ml
country
Australia
region
Barossa
appellation
Eden Valley
94
JS
94
WE
90
WS
Additional vintages
94
JS
Rated 94 by James Suckling
This riesling is turbocharged with fruit, including peach pit, apple curd, mango dessert and just a touch of petrol. Very layered and textured on the medium-to full-bodied palate, this carries stone and tropical fruit long and fresh, thanks to acidity that builds. Drink now. Screw cap. ... More details

Pewsey Vale Riesling The Contours Museum Reserve 2013 750ml

SKU 826075
Sale
$30.34
$28.84
/750ml bottle
Quantity
1
* This item is available for online ordering only. It can be picked up or shipped from our location within 4-6 business days. ?
Professional Ratings
94
JS
94
WE
90
WS
94
JS
Rated 94 by James Suckling
This riesling is turbocharged with fruit, including peach pit, apple curd, mango dessert and just a touch of petrol. Very layered and textured on the medium-to full-bodied palate, this carries stone and tropical fruit long and fresh, thanks to acidity that builds. Drink now. Screw cap.
94
WE
Rated 94 by Wine Enthusiast
Despite the age of this museum release of “Contours,” from Pewsey Vale’s oldest, coolest slopes, it’s just in its teenage years, with the potential of many more years of cellaring. Pale gold in hue, it’s gained secondary notes like lighter fluid, lemon oil, lime leaf and wild herbal undertones, but there’s also a fresh floral note still present. The palate is tightly wound and chalky-textured with crisp acidity and a pleasing bitter herbal finish. Drink now-2028 at least.
90
WS
Rated 90 by Wine Spectator
Mixes a light, mouthwatering and airy frame with intense, aromatic flavors of beeswax, lanolin, pear and lime, lingering effortlessly on the long, energetic finish. Shows plenty of precision. Drink now. 150 cases imported.
Product Details
size
750ml
country
Australia
region
Barossa
appellation
Eden Valley
Additional vintages
Overview
Rated 94 - Despite the age of this museum release of “Contours,” from Pewsey Vale’s oldest, coolest slopes, it’s just in its teenage years, with the potential of many more years of cellaring. Pale gold in hue, it’s gained secondary notes like lighter fluid, lemon oil, lime leaf and wild herbal undertones, but there’s also a fresh floral note still present. The palate is tightly wound and chalky-textured with crisp acidity and a pleasing bitter herbal finish. Drink now-2028 at least.
green-grapes.svg

Varietal: Riesling

The pale skinned fruits of the Riesling grapevine have been grown in and around Germany's Rhine Valley for centuries, and contributed much to the country's wine culture. Today, Riesling grapes are grown and processed in several countries around the world, where they are prized for their ability to grow well in colder climates, and their unique flavors and characteristics. Riesling grapes produce an impressive array of wines, including fine semi sweet and dessert wines, to excellent dry white wines and sparkling varieties, all which allow the grape to shine through as a premier example of an excellent white wine varietal. One of the things which makes Riesling such a special grape is the fact that it is highly 'terroir expressive', meaning that the features of the land it is grown on can come across well in the flavors and aromas in the wine. As such, it isn't unusual to find flavors of white stone, or smoky ash-like notes in a fine Riesling alongside the more usual orchard fruit flavors more commonly associated with good white wines.
barrel.svg

Region: Barossa

The Barossa Valley in Australia is one of the New World's most interesting wine regions, having been established in the late 19th century by German settlers. The region benefits enormously from the relatively temperate climate, which ranges from being hot on the lower parts of the valley, to quite cool as the altitude increases on the valley slopes. Barossa Valley produces mostly Shiraz wines, and has become one of the key Australian regions for this distinctive grape varietal which has gone on to be a major grape for the Australian wine industry. Despite suffering from a poor reputation in the mid 20th century, by the 1980s, plenty of unique and forward-thinking wineries set up in Barossa to take advantage of its excellent climate, and set about producing the excellent red and white wines which the region is famed for today.
field.svg

Country: Australia

Whilst most of Australia consists of arid deserts and dense bushland, the oceanic coasts to the south of the country have a terrain and climate ideal for vine cultivation and wine production. It took several decades of failed attempts at the end of the 18th century in order to produce vines of a decent enough quality for making wine, but since those first false starts, the Australian wine industry has continued to grow and grow. Today, wine production makes up for a considerable part of the Australian economy, with exports in recent years reaching unprecedented levels and even overtaking France for the first time ever. Whilst the greatest successes in regards to quality have been the result of the Syrah grape varietal (known locally as Shiraz), Australia utilizes several Old World grapes, and has had fantastic results from Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Riesling, Chardonnay and more. As the Australian passion for locally produced wine continues to develop, wineries have begun experimenting with a wider range of grape varietals, meaning that nowadays it isn't uncommon to find high quality Australian wines made from Petit Verdot, Sangiovese, Tempranillo and Viognier, amongst many others.
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More Details
Winery Pewsey Vale
green-grapes.svg

Varietal: Riesling

The pale skinned fruits of the Riesling grapevine have been grown in and around Germany's Rhine Valley for centuries, and contributed much to the country's wine culture. Today, Riesling grapes are grown and processed in several countries around the world, where they are prized for their ability to grow well in colder climates, and their unique flavors and characteristics. Riesling grapes produce an impressive array of wines, including fine semi sweet and dessert wines, to excellent dry white wines and sparkling varieties, all which allow the grape to shine through as a premier example of an excellent white wine varietal. One of the things which makes Riesling such a special grape is the fact that it is highly 'terroir expressive', meaning that the features of the land it is grown on can come across well in the flavors and aromas in the wine. As such, it isn't unusual to find flavors of white stone, or smoky ash-like notes in a fine Riesling alongside the more usual orchard fruit flavors more commonly associated with good white wines.
barrel.svg

Region: Barossa

The Barossa Valley in Australia is one of the New World's most interesting wine regions, having been established in the late 19th century by German settlers. The region benefits enormously from the relatively temperate climate, which ranges from being hot on the lower parts of the valley, to quite cool as the altitude increases on the valley slopes. Barossa Valley produces mostly Shiraz wines, and has become one of the key Australian regions for this distinctive grape varietal which has gone on to be a major grape for the Australian wine industry. Despite suffering from a poor reputation in the mid 20th century, by the 1980s, plenty of unique and forward-thinking wineries set up in Barossa to take advantage of its excellent climate, and set about producing the excellent red and white wines which the region is famed for today.
field.svg

Country: Australia

Whilst most of Australia consists of arid deserts and dense bushland, the oceanic coasts to the south of the country have a terrain and climate ideal for vine cultivation and wine production. It took several decades of failed attempts at the end of the 18th century in order to produce vines of a decent enough quality for making wine, but since those first false starts, the Australian wine industry has continued to grow and grow. Today, wine production makes up for a considerable part of the Australian economy, with exports in recent years reaching unprecedented levels and even overtaking France for the first time ever. Whilst the greatest successes in regards to quality have been the result of the Syrah grape varietal (known locally as Shiraz), Australia utilizes several Old World grapes, and has had fantastic results from Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Riesling, Chardonnay and more. As the Australian passion for locally produced wine continues to develop, wineries have begun experimenting with a wider range of grape varietals, meaning that nowadays it isn't uncommon to find high quality Australian wines made from Petit Verdot, Sangiovese, Tempranillo and Viognier, amongst many others.