Santuvario Vino Rosso Lozio 2016 750ml

size
750ml
country
Italy
region
Piedmont
appellation
Boca
WNR
Winery
80% Nebbiolo/20% Vespolina. Unlike the Santuvario Rosso, the Lozio, which is effectively Santuvario's riserva, is not made annually. The 40-plus-year-old vines are grown on sandy basalt and limestone soils on a site overlooking the sanctuary, or convent, for which the winery is named. The farming is organic and the harvest by hand. Only the most perfect bunches go into Lozio (the rest go into the Santuvario red). The fruit is destemmed and fermented with native yeasts in stainless steel tanks. Since the Vespolina ripens earlier, it and the Nebbiolo are vinified separately; the Nebbiolo is macerated for about a month. The two wines are then blended and aged in one oak botte for three years, followed by a year in bottle. Sulfur is used very sparingly at harvest, racking and bottling. 600 liters produced in 2016. Lozio is pure Boca fruit but Ivano has opted so far to eschew the appellation, not convinced that it is well-managed enough to be a meaningful indicator of quality; plus, his production scale is so small that it does not make economic sense at this early stage. The name "Lozio" has a double meaning in Italian: it is slang for "lazy' as well as meaning in two words "the uncle", in reference to himself, the proud uncle of a young niece.
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Santuvario Vino Rosso Lozio 2016 750ml

SKU 864287
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$56.95
/750ml bottle
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Winery Ratings
Winery
80% Nebbiolo/20% Vespolina. Unlike the Santuvario Rosso, the Lozio, which is effectively Santuvario's riserva, is not made annually. The 40-plus-year-old vines are grown on sandy basalt and limestone soils on a site overlooking the sanctuary, or convent, for which the winery is named. The farming is organic and the harvest by hand. Only the most perfect bunches go into Lozio (the rest go into the Santuvario red). The fruit is destemmed and fermented with native yeasts in stainless steel tanks. Since the Vespolina ripens earlier, it and the Nebbiolo are vinified separately; the Nebbiolo is macerated for about a month. The two wines are then blended and aged in one oak botte for three years, followed by a year in bottle. Sulfur is used very sparingly at harvest, racking and bottling. 600 liters produced in 2016. Lozio is pure Boca fruit but Ivano has opted so far to eschew the appellation, not convinced that it is well-managed enough to be a meaningful indicator of quality; plus, his production scale is so small that it does not make economic sense at this early stage. The name "Lozio" has a double meaning in Italian: it is slang for "lazy' as well as meaning in two words "the uncle", in reference to himself, the proud uncle of a young niece.
Product Details
size
750ml
country
Italy
region
Piedmont
appellation
Boca
Overview
80% Nebbiolo/20% Vespolina. Unlike the Santuvario Rosso, the Lozio, which is effectively Santuvario's riserva, is not made annually. The 40-plus-year-old vines are grown on sandy basalt and limestone soils on a site overlooking the sanctuary, or convent, for which the winery is named. The farming is organic and the harvest by hand. Only the most perfect bunches go into Lozio (the rest go into the Santuvario red). The fruit is destemmed and fermented with native yeasts in stainless steel tanks. Since the Vespolina ripens earlier, it and the Nebbiolo are vinified separately; the Nebbiolo is macerated for about a month. The two wines are then blended and aged in one oak botte for three years, followed by a year in bottle. Sulfur is used very sparingly at harvest, racking and bottling. 600 liters produced in 2016. Lozio is pure Boca fruit but Ivano has opted so far to eschew the appellation, not convinced that it is well-managed enough to be a meaningful indicator of quality; plus, his production scale is so small that it does not make economic sense at this early stage. The name "Lozio" has a double meaning in Italian: it is slang for "lazy' as well as meaning in two words "the uncle", in reference to himself, the proud uncle of a young niece.
barrel

Region: Piedmont

The region of Piedmont in the cool, breezy north-western part of Italy is renowned throughout the world for high quality, flavorful and delicious red wines, and for the elegant and refined sparkling wines such as Asti which typify the area. The region is located at the foothills of the Alps, close to the French and Swiss borders, and benefits from some interesting micro-climates formed by its proximity to the mountain range. The key grapes for the fine red wines of Piedmont are Nebbiolo, Dolcetto and Barbera – all powerful varietals which are packed full of a range of fruit flavors and which have an affinity for oak making them ideal for aging When it comes to the sparkling Asti, wineries cultivate plenty of Moscato grapes, whose relative transparency make them ideal for expressing their terroir and providing some interesting flavors in the bottle.
fields

Country: Italy

There are few countries in the world with a viticultural history as long or as illustrious as that claimed by Italy. Grapes were first being grown and cultivated on Italian soil several thousand years ago by the Greeks and the Pheonicians, who named Italy 'Oenotria' – the land of wines – so impressed were they with the climate and the suitability of the soil for wine production. Of course, it was the rise of the Roman Empire which had the most lasting influence on wine production in Italy, and their influence can still be felt today, as much of the riches of the empire came about through their enthusiasm for producing wines and exporting it to neighbouring countries. Since those times, a vast amount of Italian land has remained primarily for vine cultivation, and thousands of wineries can be found throughout the entire length and breadth of this beautiful country, drenched in Mediterranean sunshine and benefiting from the excellent fertile soils found there. Italy remains very much a 'land of wines', and one could not imagine this country, its landscape and culture, without it.
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Winery Santuvario
barrel

Region: Piedmont

The region of Piedmont in the cool, breezy north-western part of Italy is renowned throughout the world for high quality, flavorful and delicious red wines, and for the elegant and refined sparkling wines such as Asti which typify the area. The region is located at the foothills of the Alps, close to the French and Swiss borders, and benefits from some interesting micro-climates formed by its proximity to the mountain range. The key grapes for the fine red wines of Piedmont are Nebbiolo, Dolcetto and Barbera – all powerful varietals which are packed full of a range of fruit flavors and which have an affinity for oak making them ideal for aging When it comes to the sparkling Asti, wineries cultivate plenty of Moscato grapes, whose relative transparency make them ideal for expressing their terroir and providing some interesting flavors in the bottle.
fields

Country: Italy

There are few countries in the world with a viticultural history as long or as illustrious as that claimed by Italy. Grapes were first being grown and cultivated on Italian soil several thousand years ago by the Greeks and the Pheonicians, who named Italy 'Oenotria' – the land of wines – so impressed were they with the climate and the suitability of the soil for wine production. Of course, it was the rise of the Roman Empire which had the most lasting influence on wine production in Italy, and their influence can still be felt today, as much of the riches of the empire came about through their enthusiasm for producing wines and exporting it to neighbouring countries. Since those times, a vast amount of Italian land has remained primarily for vine cultivation, and thousands of wineries can be found throughout the entire length and breadth of this beautiful country, drenched in Mediterranean sunshine and benefiting from the excellent fertile soils found there. Italy remains very much a 'land of wines', and one could not imagine this country, its landscape and culture, without it.