$22.94
$24.94
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Antinori Castello Della Sala Orvieto San Giovanni 2018 750ml

Cervaro della Sala, the “flagship” wine of this estate, has earned important recognition and countless fond admirers. It is a blend of...
$23.94
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Antinori Sauvignon Blanc Conte De La Vipera Toscana 2017 750ml

The 2017 Conte della Vipera is straw yellow in color with greenish highlights. On the nose, the wine offers a striking bouquet of ripe fruit:...
$24.94
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$24.94
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$20.65
$22.94
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Colpetrone Sagrantino Di Montefalco 2011 750ml

Rated 93 - So much pressed lavender to the nose here as well as the classic brambleberries but also some hints of sour cherries, leather and...
93JS
$26.74
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Decugnano Dei Barbi Il Rosso A.D. 1212 2016 750ml

Rated 92 - Deep and vibrant dark-berry aromas with fresh flowers and hot stones, following through to a full body, chewy and dusty tannins and a...
92JS
$26.94
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$28.94
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$29.74
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$27.45
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$23.63
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Palazzone Orvieto Campo Del Guardiano 2015 750ml

Rated 93 - This complex and structured wine opens with intense ripe orchard fruit, tropical fruit, herb and balsamic aromas. The round, full-bodied...
93WE
90WS
$29.94
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Rocca Di Fabbri Sagrantino Di Montefalco 2013 750ml

Rated 91 - Aromatic, with hints of medicinal herb and coffee liqueur, this offers baked black cherry, fig cake and smoke notes and firm, velvety...
91WS

Italy Umbria $20 - $30

There are few countries in the world with a viticultural history as long or as illustrious as that claimed by Italy. Grapes were first being grown and cultivated on Italian soil several thousand years ago by the Greeks and the Pheonicians, who named Italy 'Oenotria' – the land of wines – so impressed were they with the climate and the suitability of the soil for wine production. Of course, it was the rise of the Roman Empire which had the most lasting influence on wine production in Italy, and their influence can still be felt today, as much of the riches of the empire came about through their enthusiasm for producing wines and exporting it to neighbouring countries. Since those times, a vast amount of Italian land has remained primarily for vine cultivation, and thousands of wineries can be found throughout the entire length and breadth of this beautiful country, drenched in Mediterranean sunshine and benefiting from the excellent fertile soils found there. Italy remains very much a 'land of wines', and one could not imagine this country, its landscape and culture, without it.

Despite being one of Italy's smallest wine regions, the central Italian region of Umbria is a vitally important one, and home to many of the country's finest and most historic wines and wineries. The reputation of Umbrian wines may have suffered in the 1970s, along with the produce of much of the rest of the country, but the 1980s and 1990s saw significant efforts made by vintners when it came to improving their produce and overall image. By consulting international oenologists, the wineries of Umbria were able to update their traditional techniques, and produce considerably finer wines from their Sangiovese grapes, as well as from imported varietals such as Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot and Chardonnay. Indeed, the barrel fermented white wines of Umbria, now made with a blend of Chardonnay and Grechetto varietal grapes, has gone on to be something of a flagship product for the region, and is regarded as one of the best and most characterful white wines in Italy.