envelope

$16.94
$16.04
Check availability
Add Add to wish list

Alto Limay Pinot Noir 2014 750ml

Rated 91 - This is a very balanced and refined pinot with a lovely fine tannin texture and length. Lots of dark fruits and spices. More Sonoma...

Argentina Patagonia Pinot Noir

As the world's fifth largest producer of wine, after France, Italy, Spain and the United States, Argentina has plenty to offer the international wine market in regards to both quantity and quality. Despite this being the case for several decades now, it has only been since the end of the twentieth century that the Argentinian wine industry has really begun to up their game when it comes to the methods and techniques required to produce world class wines, which are both representative of their country and region of origin, and which stand alone as complex, interesting and delicious wines to drink. As Argentina became a serious contender in the international wine market, wineries previously concerned primarily with high volumes began to change their priorities, and formerly struggling small bodegas and independent wineries began to find success. Nowadays, well crafted wines from smaller vineyards in Argentina are being lauded as some of the finest in the world, and the country is starting to reap the benefits of its heritage, which include some very old vines, and up to four centuries of experience in wine production.

Patagonia is not a region which immediately comes to mind when considering ideal locations for viticulture, which is something which makes Patagonia's annual output of fine wines all the more impressive. Situated in the very south of South America, and lying on both the Argentinian and Chilean sides of the Andean mountains, Patagonia has been settled in by many different nationalities over the centuries, making it a fascinating place for wine production and culture. Perhaps due to the eclectic mix of people who made Patagonia their home, the wines of the region are an interesting mix of many European style wines – far more 'old world' in style than other wines found elsewhere in Argentina or Chile. Whilst red wine varietals such as Pinot Noir and Malbec thrive quite happily in the Patagonian soils, it is the region's white wine grapes; Riesling, Sauvignon Blanc and Gewurztraminer which are most widely admired for the wines they produce.

Regularly described as being the grape varietal responsible for producing the world's most romantic wines, Pinot Noir has long been associated with elegance and a broad range of flavors The name means 'black pine' in French, and this is due to the fact that the fruit of this particular varietal is especially dark in color, and hangs in a conical shape, like that of a pine cone. Despite being grown today in almost every wine producing country, Pinot Noir is a notoriously difficult grape variety to cultivate. This is because it is especially susceptible to various forms of mold and mildew, and thrives best in steady, cooler climates. However, the quality of the fruit has ensured that wineries and vintners have persevered with the varietal, and new technologies and methods have overcome many of the problems it presents. Alongside this, the wide popularity and enthusiasm for this grape has ensured it will remain a firm favorite amongst wine drinkers for many years to come.