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2014 Austria Kremstal Kamptal Muscat

Archaeological evidence suggests that grapevines have been grown and cultivated in what is today modern Austria for over four thousand years, making it one of the oldest wine producing countries in the world. Over the centuries, relatively little has changed in Austrian wine, with the dominant grape varietals continuing to be Grüner Veltliner, Zweigelt, Pinot Noir and others. Austria is renowned for producing excellent and characterful dry white wines, although in the eastern part of the country, many wineries specialist in sweeter white wines made in a similar style to those of neighboring Hungary. Today, Austria has over fifty thousand hectares under vine, split over four key wine regions. The domestic wine industry remains strong, with Austrians drinking their local produce outside in the summer, and people around the world are beginning to once more rediscover this fascinating and ancient wine culture.

The beautiful, airy and rolling landscape of Austria's Kremstal wine region is one of the most important and highly regarded in all of central Europe. Indeed, the three thousand hectares of vineyards which cover this stunning and special region are responsible for producing Austria's most characterful wines. The spicy, unique and vibrant Gruner Veltliner grapes which grow in abundance around Kremstal and Kamptal have made Austrian wines a favorite with European royalty for centuries, and the wine industry of this region is finding new fans and admirers across the world in the modern age. As well as the Gruner Veltliner wines made here, the region is also famous for its mineral rich Riesling wines, the grapes of which thrive in the cooler climate found across Kremstal and the banks of the mighty river Danube.

One of the most widely grown and easily recognized wine grape varietals in the world is the Muscat, an ancient grape with an exceptional amount of versatility. For centuries, Muscat varietal grapes have been used all over Europe for the production of wonderfully fruity wines of many different shades and colors, which, with their strong 'grapey' flavor have come to be known as a quintessential fine wine grape. Their relatively high acidity also means they are ideal for the production of sparkling wines, and the fizzy Muscat wines of Italy are widely agreed to be amongst the best in the world. In more recent years, New World countries have shown a huge amount of flair when it comes to the Muscat grape, and have had plenty of success in allowing its natural and vibrant character to come through in the bottle.