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Austria Burgenland Pinot Noir

Archaeological evidence suggests that grapevines have been grown and cultivated in what is today modern Austria for over four thousand years, making it one of the oldest wine producing countries in the world. Over the centuries, relatively little has changed in Austrian wine, with the dominant grape varietals continuing to be Grüner Veltliner, Zweigelt, Pinot Noir and others. Austria is renowned for producing excellent and characterful dry white wines, although in the eastern part of the country, many wineries specialist in sweeter white wines made in a similar style to those of neighboring Hungary. Today, Austria has over fifty thousand hectares under vine, split over four key wine regions. The domestic wine industry remains strong, with Austrians drinking their local produce outside in the summer, and people around the world are beginning to once more rediscover this fascinating and ancient wine culture.

Austria is a fascinating and ancient wine producing country, which once was heralded by the royal families and aristocracy of Europe as one of the finest and most important centers of viticulture in the world. Indeed, the wines of this central European country are home to many of the most surprising and seductive wines available today, and the eastern region of Burgenland is perhaps one of the finest regions Austria has. Whilst most of Austria is renowned for its off-dry and flavorful white wines, Burgenland is home to the country's red wine producers, with vineyards there being full of Pinot Noir, Zwiegelt and Blaufrankisch grapes, resulting in a wide palate of delicious and juicy reds. This is perhaps due to the relatively large amounts of sunshine and heat the region enjoys each year, and the proximity to one of the country's largest lakes, which helps red grapes reach their full potential.

Regularly described as being the grape varietal responsible for producing the world's most romantic wines, Pinot Noir has long been associated with elegance and a broad range of flavors The name means 'black pine' in French, and this is due to the fact that the fruit of this particular varietal is especially dark in color, and hangs in a conical shape, like that of a pine cone. Despite being grown today in almost every wine producing country, Pinot Noir is a notoriously difficult grape variety to cultivate. This is because it is especially susceptible to various forms of mold and mildew, and thrives best in steady, cooler climates. However, the quality of the fruit has ensured that wineries and vintners have persevered with the varietal, and new technologies and methods have overcome many of the problems it presents. Alongside this, the wide popularity and enthusiasm for this grape has ensured it will remain a firm favorite amongst wine drinkers for many years to come.