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2012 Champagne Blend Germany Rheingau / Rheinhessen

The sparkling wines of Champagne have been revered by wine drinkers for hundreds of years, and even today they maintain their reputation for excellence of flavor and character, and are consistently associated with quality, decadence, and a cause for celebration. Their unique characteristics are partly due to the careful blending of a small number of selected grape varietals, most commonly Chardonnay and Pinot Noir. These grapes, blended in fairly equal quantities, give the wines of Champagne their wonderful flavors and aromas, with the Pinot Noir offering length and backbone, and the Chardonnay varietal giving its acidity and dry, biscuity nature. It isn't unusual to sometimes see Champagne labeled as 'blanc de blanc', meaning it is made using only Chardonnay varietal grapes, or 'blanc de noir', which is made solely with Pinot Noir.

As in many Old World countries, the rise of viticulture in Germany came about as a result of the Roman Empire, who saw the potential for vine cultivation in the vast flatlands around the base of the Rhine valley. Indeed, for over a thousand years, Germany's wine production levels were enormous, with much of the south of the country being used more or less exclusively for growing grapes. Over time, this diminished to make way for expanding cities and other types of industries, but Southern Germany remains very much an important wine region within Europe, with many beautifully balanced and flavorful German wines being prized by locals and international wine lovers alike. The hills around Baden-Baden and Mannheim are especially noteworthy, as these produce the high end of the characteristic semi-sweet white wines which couple so perfectly with German cheeses and pickled vegetables. However, all of Germany's wine producing regions have something special and unique to offer, and are a joy to explore and experience.

The region of Rheinhessen is the largest and most productive of all of Germany’s wine regions, and wine has been produced here since the Roman occupation of the country. It was favored by Charlemagne, too, whose influence was felt all over Europe, and Rheinhessen wines were at many points in history the height of fashion. Rheinhessen is bordered by the mighty river Rhine in the north and to the west, and is typified by its undulating topography - indeed, it is known locally as the ‘land of a thousand hills’.

The finest appellations in Rheinhessen are generally considered to be those in the Roter Hang (red slope), where the red sandstone soil imparts plenty of character and fascinating features. However, many popular and highly regarded wines from Rheinhessen are produced on the banks of the river Rhine, where the varied soils are full of interesting characteristics carried by the water. The majority of wines produced in this part of Germany are white, with sixty nine percent of the region’s total output being made up of Riesling and Muller-Thurgau varietal grapes. Red wines also thrive here, though, and Dornfelder is a popular varietal which is regularly praised for its depth and expression.