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Dr. Hermann Urziger Wurzgarten Riesling Kabinett 2016 750ml

Rated 90 - This represents Hermann’s first (October 10) picking of the vintage, from 60- to 80-year-old vines ranging from 78 to 80 Oechsle....
$32.34
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$35.74
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Dr. Thanisch Riesling Kabinett Bernkasteler Doktor Vineyard 2014 750ml

Rated 93 - The 2014 Berncasteler Doctor Riesling Kabinett shows a very clear and elegant, also intense and concentrated bouquet of ripe yellow...
$12.39
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Dr. Wagner Riesling Kabinett Ockfener Bockstein 2015 750ml

Rated 88 - Fresh apple laced with vanilla evokes Wehlener Sonnenuhr. Impeccably judged sweetness enhances a luscious, light palate impression. An...
$21.24
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Dr. Wagner Riesling Spatlese Ockfener Bockstein 2015 750ml

Rated 90 - Mango, muskmelon and white peach reveal a much riper fruit spectrum than that displayed by the corresponding Kabinett, and one to which...
$18.44
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$15.84
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$15.84
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$19.24
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St. Urbans-Hof Riesling Alte Reben Wiltlinger 2014 750ml

Rated 90 - Fermented in stainless steel and tasted from the Magnum (AP #3), the 2014 Wiltinger Alte Reben offers a lovely, clear, bright and flinty...
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Germany Mittel Mosel Mosel-Saar-Ruwer Riesling

As in many Old World countries, the rise of viticulture in Germany came about as a result of the Roman Empire, who saw the potential for vine cultivation in the vast flatlands around the base of the Rhine valley. Indeed, for over a thousand years, Germany's wine production levels were enormous, with much of the south of the country being used more or less exclusively for growing grapes. Over time, this diminished to make way for expanding cities and other types of industries, but Southern Germany remains very much an important wine region within Europe, with many beautifully balanced and flavorful German wines being prized by locals and international wine lovers alike. The hills around Baden-Baden and Mannheim are especially noteworthy, as these produce the high end of the characteristic semi-sweet white wines which couple so perfectly with German cheeses and pickled vegetables. However, all of Germany's wine producing regions have something special and unique to offer, and are a joy to explore and experience.

The beautiful German wine region of Mosel-Saar-Ruwer (nowadays commonly referred to simply as ‘Mosel’) is surely the country’s star attraction when it comes to viticulture. Dramatic, historic and sensational, the wines which come out of this special region are renowned for their ability to beautifully express their unique terroir, as well as the fine, traditional methods which go into their production. One of the main features of Mosel-Saar-Ruwer is the extremely steep slopes on which the vines are grown. They are perilous to negotiate, extremely difficult to maintain, but there’s no doubt in the local vintner’s minds that the results are absolutely worth the effort. The superb drainage these vineyards benefit from, along with the cool climate they receive, help to produce wines of remarkable character and balance which have an enormous global fanbase.

The most popular wine produced in Mosel-Saar-Ruwer is surely Riesling, the noble germanic grape which produces such fascinating, mineral characteristics in the bottle, and which can be drunk young or aged to create stunning results. Over fifty percent of Mosel-Saar-Ruwer’s fine vineyards are planted with Riesling, so popular are the wines made from this fruit. However, other white varietals such as Weissburgunder do very well here too, and red grape varietals like Pinot Noir also produce impressive wines.

Riesling grapes have been grown in and around central Europe for centuries, and over time, they became the lasting symbol of south Germany's ancient and proud wine culture. Whilst the reputation of German wines abroad has in the past been mixed, the Germans themselves take an enormous amount of pride in their wineries, and Riesling grapes have now spread around the globe, growing anywhere with the correct climate in which they can thrive. Riesling grape varietals generally require much cooler climatic conditions than many other white grapes, and they are generally considered to be a very 'terroir expressive' varietal, meaning that the features and characteristics of the terroir they are grown on comes across in the flavors and aromas in the bottle. It is this important feature which has allowed Riesling wines to be elevated into the category of 'fine' white wines, as the features of the top quality bottles are generally considered to be highly unique and offer much to interest wine enthusiasts.