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Red
1.5Ltr
Bottle: $45.00
Brown spice, crushed fall leaves cherry sauce and a lifting hint of fresh mint form a darkly alluring bouquet as the...
VM
92
Sale
Red
750ml
Bottle: $20.24 $22.72
Brown spice, crushed fall leaves cherry sauce and a lifting hint of fresh mint form a darkly alluring bouquet as the...
VM
92
Red
750ml
Bottle: $42.72
6 bottles: $42.00
The 2010 Montefalco Sagrantino Sacer is dark and imposing in the glass. An air of crushed rocks gives way to balsamic...
12 FREE
VM
93
JS
92
Case only
Red
750ml - Case of 6
Bottle: $110.68
A more muscular sagrantino with chewy tannins and a clean bead of vanilla-tinged blackcurrant that’s still...
12 FREE
JS
92
Red
750ml
Bottle: $40.94
6 bottles: $40.12
12 FREE
Red
12 FREE
Red
12 FREE
Red
750ml
Bottle: $47.94
It is the first Sagrantino produced by the company, the one with which Giampaolo Tabarrini immediately made people...
12 FREE
Red
12 FREE
Case only
Long-term Pre-Arrival
Red
750ml - Case of 6
Bottle: $107.95
Deep, dark and almost animalistic in nature, the 1997 Montefalco Sagrantino 25 Anni boasts a rich ruby hue in the...
VM
95
WS
91
Case only
Long-term Pre-Arrival
Red
750ml - Case of 6
Bottle: $75.95
One of the headline wines of Umbria, the 2018 Montefalco Sagrantino 25 Anni gives us an important and complex...
WA
94
VM
94

Italy Umbria Montefalco Sagrantino

There are few countries in the world with a viticultural history as long or as illustrious as that claimed by Italy. Grapes were first being grown and cultivated on Italian soil several thousand years ago by the Greeks and the Pheonicians, who named Italy 'Oenotria' – the land of wines – so impressed were they with the climate and the suitability of the soil for wine production. Of course, it was the rise of the Roman Empire which had the most lasting influence on wine production in Italy, and their influence can still be felt today, as much of the riches of the empire came about through their enthusiasm for producing wines and exporting it to neighbouring countries. Since those times, a vast amount of Italian land has remained primarily for vine cultivation, and thousands of wineries can be found throughout the entire length and breadth of this beautiful country, drenched in Mediterranean sunshine and benefiting from the excellent fertile soils found there. Italy remains very much a 'land of wines', and one could not imagine this country, its landscape and culture, without it.

Despite being one of Italy's smallest wine regions, the central Italian region of Umbria is a vitally important one, and home to many of the country's finest and most historic wines and wineries. The reputation of Umbrian wines may have suffered in the 1970s, along with the produce of much of the rest of the country, but the 1980s and 1990s saw significant efforts made by vintners when it came to improving their produce and overall image. By consulting international oenologists, the wineries of Umbria were able to update their traditional techniques, and produce considerably finer wines from their Sangiovese grapes, as well as from imported varietals such as Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot and Chardonnay. Indeed, the barrel fermented white wines of Umbria, now made with a blend of Chardonnay and Grechetto varietal grapes, has gone on to be something of a flagship product for the region, and is regarded as one of the best and most characterful white wines in Italy.