The beautiful German wine region of Pfalz is the second biggest in the country, and is upheld as one of the finest in all of central Europe. A long and narrow region, just nine miles wide, it sits on the French border, and shares many characteristics with Alsace on its western border. This is a peaceful, verdant region, where grapevines outnumber inhabitants by a ratio of six hundred to one, and as such, it comes as no surprise to find that the wines produced here are laid back, elegant affairs which pair perfectly with the slow-cooked cuisine of the region.

The history of Pfalz is an impressive one, and before the phylloxera epidemic wreaked its effects on the region, it was widely regarded as one of the best in the world. Indeed, the Riesling wines of Pfalz used to grace the tables of the crowned heads of Europe, and were even served at the dinner which heralded the opening of the Suez Canal in 1869. The fine old vines which grow there benefit from the warm and dry summers (this is the warmest region of Germany by far), and the very mild winters which produce wines of extraordinary balance and expression.