Finger Lakes New York Pinot Noir Seneca Lake

When it comes to New York wine regions, Finger Lakes reigns supreme. Wines have been made in New York for longer than in any other part of the US, with the first vineyards being planted there over three hundred years ago by Dutch settlers. Finger Lakes is home to two of the United States’ oldest operating wineries, dating back to the 1860s, which continue to produce characterful wines inspired by France’s Alsace region.

Finger Lakes is New York’s largest and most productive wine region, with over one hundred separate wineries located on the banks of the six long, narrow lakes. The majority of the wines produced in this fascinating region are made from Chardonnay and Riesling varietal grapes, with Gewurztraminer and Pinot Noir also growing well in the unique microclimate that the lakes provide. Indeed, it is the lakes themselves that influence the climatic conditions of the region - without them, the early winters and springs would be far too cold to effectively grow vines, but the lakes allow warmth to be maintained throughout the colder months, and temper the heat of the summer. This allows for a long and fruitful growing and ripening season, which gives the berries the chance to take on plenty of character and many fascinating features of this beautiful terroir.

New York state has a wine history which stretches back to the mid-17th century, when Dutch settlers first began cultivating grape vines in the Hudson Valley. Since then, the wine industry of New York has grown from strength to strength, mixing the old with the new as wineries continue to experiment with modern techniques alongside their traditional heritage. Indeed, certain wineries in New York state hold a claim to being amongst the oldest and most well established in the New World, with at least one dating back over three hundred and fifty years. New York state is responsible for a relatively small range of grape varietals, due to its cooler, damper climate, but many varietals such as Riesling and Seyval Blanc thrive in such conditions and produce wines a of singular quality.
Regularly described as being the grape varietal responsible for producing the world's most romantic wines, Pinot Noir has long been associated with elegance and a broad range of flavors The name means 'black pine' in French, and this is due to the fact that the fruit of this particular varietal is especially dark in color, and hangs in a conical shape, like that of a pine cone. Despite being grown today in almost every wine producing country, Pinot Noir is a notoriously difficult grape variety to cultivate. This is because it is especially susceptible to various forms of mold and mildew, and thrives best in steady, cooler climates. However, the quality of the fruit has ensured that wineries and vintners have persevered with the varietal, and new technologies and methods have overcome many of the problems it presents. Alongside this, the wide popularity and enthusiasm for this grape has ensured it will remain a firm favorite amongst wine drinkers for many years to come.