Pinot Noir South Eastern Australia

Regularly described as being the grape varietal responsible for producing the world's most romantic wines, Pinot Noir has long been associated with elegance and a broad range of flavors The name means 'black pine' in French, and this is due to the fact that the fruit of this particular varietal is especially dark in color, and hangs in a conical shape, like that of a pine cone. Despite being grown today in almost every wine producing country, Pinot Noir is a notoriously difficult grape variety to cultivate. This is because it is especially susceptible to various forms of mold and mildew, and thrives best in steady, cooler climates. However, the quality of the fruit has ensured that wineries and vintners have persevered with the varietal, and new technologies and methods have overcome many of the problems it presents. Alongside this, the wide popularity and enthusiasm for this grape has ensured it will remain a firm favorite amongst wine drinkers for many years to come.

South-Eastern Australia is a vast stretch of land which is recognized as a GI (Geographical Indication) wine region. It covers an entire third of the country, and the boundary on the west of the region is no less than 1250 miles long. As such, this enormous wine region is one of the most varied in the world, and includes mountain ranges, desert, rainforest and coastlines. It is in the coastal areas where most viticulture takes place, as the blazing heat of this part of the world is there tempered by the cooling ocean breezes and fogs which roll daily over the vineyards, allowing for more balance and acidity in the grapes which grow.

This part of Australia is typified by a bold and daring type of viticulture, with vintners here constantly looking at ways of pushing the boundaries and using new techniques to make the most of their fruit. Organic and Biodynamic farming has taken off in a big way, as Australian winemakers look for ways to express their unique land in the bottle. The vast majority of vines grown here are classic imported French grapes, including Semillon, Chardonnay, Shiraz, Merlot and Cabernet Sauvignon, although lesser known varietals are increasing in popularity and prevalence.