Sauvignon Blanc South Eastern Australia

The green skinned grapes of the Sauvignon Blanc varietal had their origins in Southern France, where they are still widely grown and used for many of the excellent young and aged white wines the region is famous for. Today, however, they are grown in almost every wine producing country in the world, and are widely revered for their fresh and grassy flavors, full of tropical notes and refreshing, zesty character. Sauvignon Blanc grapes thrive best in moderate climates, and ripen relatively early in the year. This has made them a favorite for many wineries in the New World, where they can still produce healthy and high yields in the earlier part of the summer before the temperatures become too hot. Too much heat has a massively adverse effect on Sauvignon Blanc, as the grapes become dull in their flavor, and the wine produced from them loses all its unique character and high points. As such, Sauvignon Blanc farmers have had a lot of trouble from global warming and climate change, as they are being forced to harvest their crops increasingly earlier in the year when it is cool enough to do so.

South-Eastern Australia is a vast stretch of land which is recognized as a GI (Geographical Indication) wine region. It covers an entire third of the country, and the boundary on the west of the region is no less than 1250 miles long. As such, this enormous wine region is one of the most varied in the world, and includes mountain ranges, desert, rainforest and coastlines. It is in the coastal areas where most viticulture takes place, as the blazing heat of this part of the world is there tempered by the cooling ocean breezes and fogs which roll daily over the vineyards, allowing for more balance and acidity in the grapes which grow.

This part of Australia is typified by a bold and daring type of viticulture, with vintners here constantly looking at ways of pushing the boundaries and using new techniques to make the most of their fruit. Organic and Biodynamic farming has taken off in a big way, as Australian winemakers look for ways to express their unique land in the bottle. The vast majority of vines grown here are classic imported French grapes, including Semillon, Chardonnay, Shiraz, Merlot and Cabernet Sauvignon, although lesser known varietals are increasing in popularity and prevalence.