$17.54
Add Add to wish list

Adegas Rosalia De Castro Paco & Lola Albarino Rias Baixas 2018 750ml

beautiful straw yellow color with greenish highlights, clean and bright. Powerful aromas, rich in fruit expression (citrus, grapefruit) and with...
$45.94
Add Add to wish list

Atalier by Raul Perez Albarino A Cruz das Animas 2018 1.5Ltr

Rated 93 - One white that is sold with appellation of origin Rias Baixas is the 2018 Atalier, which has clean and fresh aromas and flavors, with...
93WA
$16.94
Add Add to wish list
$19.54
Add Add to wish list

Bodega Castro Martin Albarino 2017 750ml

Made with selected grapes from prime vineyard locations, our Family Estate wine exhibits many fine, elegant qualities. With a distinct salty...
$19.94
Add Add to wish list
$16.94
Add Add to wish list
$15.94
Add Add to wish list
$13.10
Add Add to wish list
$22.88
Add Add to wish list

Eidos De Padrinan Albarino Rias Baixas 2018 750ml

Rated 90 - This white shows a generous texture, round and polished. Ripe pear and melon flavors mingle with ginger and spice notes, finishing with...
90WS
$17.94
Add Add to wish list

Fillaboa Albarino 2018 750ml

Tangy and pleasing with juicy flavors of tropical fruits and spices.
$16.94
Add Add to wish list
$18.94
$19.54
Add Add to wish list

Granbazan Albarino Rias Baixas Etiqueta Ambar 2018 750ml

Deep, aromatic and steely, with lingering, complex flavors of spice and citrus. Best Value.
$17.94
Add Add to wish list
$14.16
Add Add to wish list

La Val Albarino Rias Baixas 2019 750ml

Complex aromas and flavors of citrus and tropical fruits.
$19.54
Add Add to wish list
$14.95
$15.74
Add Add to wish list
$13.58
$14.29
Add Add to wish list

Martin Codax Albarino Rias Baixas 750ml

The Martin Codax Rias Baixas Albarino is delicate and medium-bodied with a crisp, dry finish.On the palate, flavors of pear, passion fruit, ripe...

Galicia Rias Baixas Spain

The northern Spanish wine region of Galicia is a fascinating one indeed, and is most definitely a wine region to keep your eye on today and in the near future. Once an important center of viticulture and wine trade, Galicia suffered from a huge and devastating economic depression in the 19th century, leaving many of the vineyards untended and useless. However, the 20th century saw various organizations pour money into Galician wine making, thus rebooting the wine industry of this relative wet and windy region on the Atlantic coast. Today, the region is being celebrated for its superb and flavorful blended white wines, made from native grape varietals such as Albarino and Caino Blanca, and is continuing to rebuild itself and regain former glories.




Apart from sherry and Malaga, classic Spanish white wines have never been popular outside their own country. They tended to be oaky, high in alcohol, low acid and prematurely aged - in a word, flat. But the wines of Rias Baixas in Galicia (in addition to Penedes and a few other areas) indicate that Spanish white wines can be very different. Rias Baixas, in the extreme northwest bordering on Portugal, receives moist Atlantic breezes that give it a cool, damp Mediterranean climate. Wines here are fresh, dry and somewhat acidic. Often compared to those of the nearby Vinho Verde region of Portugal, they are significantly more interesting, and perfect for drinking with seafood and chicken dishes. The major white varietal by far is Albarino; the remaining ten percent of vineyards can contain Caia Blanca, Treixadura, and Loureiro. The best Rias Baixas wines have floral aromas and an apricot character sometimes compared to Condrieu. Reds are not exported



Ever since the Phoenicians and Romans brought their knowledge of vine cultivation to Spanish soils, the country's culture has grown alongside wine production, with wine being a vital part of Spanish identity and Spanish traditions. Each region of Spain has a wine quite distinct from the others, and it is produced by smallholders and families as much as it is by large companies and established wineries. From the relatively mild and lush regions of La Rioja to the arid plateaus that surround Madrid, grapes are grown in abundance for the now booming Spanish wine industry, and new laws and regulations have recently been put in place to keep the country's standards high. By combining traditional practices with modern technology, Spanish wineries are continuing to produce distinctive wines of great character, flavor and aroma, with the focus shifting in recent decades to quality over quantity.