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Castilla Y Leon Pinot Noir Spain

The ancient, arid and beautiful region of Castilla y Leon is the largest in Spain, and amongst the largest single 'regions' in any country of Europe. It has been famed throughout the centuries for its architecture, its people, its art and literature, and not least for its characterful and flavorful wines, which capture the beating heart and passion of Spain and Spanish culture. Castilla y Leon is essentially a vast plateau, and is extremely dry, with a poor soil structure which one might think would make viticulture difficult, if not impossible. However, Castilla y Leon has plenty of native grape varietals which are able to stretch their roots deep underground, to tap into the moisture and minerals which can be found there.

Regularly described as being the grape varietal responsible for producing the world's most romantic wines, Pinot Noir has long been associated with elegance and a broad range of flavors The name means 'black pine' in French, and this is due to the fact that the fruit of this particular varietal is especially dark in color, and hangs in a conical shape, like that of a pine cone. Despite being grown today in almost every wine producing country, Pinot Noir is a notoriously difficult grape variety to cultivate. This is because it is especially susceptible to various forms of mold and mildew, and thrives best in steady, cooler climates. However, the quality of the fruit has ensured that wineries and vintners have persevered with the varietal, and new technologies and methods have overcome many of the problems it presents. Alongside this, the wide popularity and enthusiasm for this grape has ensured it will remain a firm favorite amongst wine drinkers for many years to come.

Ever since the Phoenicians and Romans brought their knowledge of vine cultivation to Spanish soils, the country's culture has grown alongside wine production, with wine being a vital part of Spanish identity and Spanish traditions. Each region of Spain has a wine quite distinct from the others, and it is produced by smallholders and families as much as it is by large companies and established wineries. From the relatively mild and lush regions of La Rioja to the arid plateaus that surround Madrid, grapes are grown in abundance for the now booming Spanish wine industry, and new laws and regulations have recently been put in place to keep the country's standards high. By combining traditional practices with modern technology, Spanish wineries are continuing to produce distinctive wines of great character, flavor and aroma, with the focus shifting in recent decades to quality over quantity.