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Stonestreet Chardonnay 2013 750ml

Rated 92 - Stonestreet's 2013 Estate Chardonnay is fabulous. Apricot pit, butter, spices, wild flowers and honey meld together in a Chardonnay...
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Stonestreet Chardonnay Upper Barn 2013 750ml

Rated 93 - The 2013 Upper Barn, a vineyard that Helen Turley and John Wetlaufer made famous, spends 11 months in 49% new French oak and is...
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Stonestreet Legacy 2012 750ml

Rated 95 - The 2012 Proprietary Red Legacy, an 866-case blend of 68% Cabernet Sauvignon and the rest Merlot and Cabernet Franc, may turn out to be...
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Stonestreet Sauvignon Blanc 2014 750ml

Rated 90 - The 2014 Sauvignon Blanc is an attractive wine that brings together aromatic nuance with the phenolic, structural elements that are...

Alexander Valley Sonoma Valley United States

For two hundred and fifty years, the Alexander Valley in California’s beautiful Sonoma county has been producing fascinating and characterful wines, and this specific AVA has been responsible for securing Sonoma’s reputation worldwide as being one of the finest New World wine producing regions. Today, Alexander Valley is the most productive and prodigious sub-region of Sonoma County, being the largest in area and most densely planted part of this side of California’s wine country.

The secret of Alexander Valley’s success is manyfold. The climatic conditions the region enjoys are influenced greatly by the Russian River, and the fact that it is sheltered from the Pacific winds by the low-lying hills to the west of the valley. Alexander Valley is one of the warmest wine regions in California by day, but at night temperatures drop significantly, allowing for a long and balanced growing and ripening season, and resulting in beautifully balanced wines with plenty of expression.

The area is notable mainly for the success it has experienced with Bordeaux grape varietals, especially Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot. These grapes grow healthily in Alexander Valley, and the rich, alluvial soil is said to impart a richness and chocolatey character and a level of voluptuousness which sets them well apart from their French equivalents. The region has also seen great results with other classic European grapes, such as Nebbiolo and Sangiovese.

California's beautiful and remarkably fertile Sonoma Valley has grown over the decades to become one of the United States' most respected and profitable wine regions, with wineries within the region benefiting from the superb Californian sunshine, low rainfall and wonderfully rich soils. Because of this vital combination of excellent conditions, the region is able to grow a wide range of grape varietals for use in the production of an impressive array of wines, with many different red and white wine grapes flourishing each year and producing excellent and characterful results. The soils have been enriched by volcanic activity, and the presence of geothermal springs, which make this region a unique one, and very much the beating heart of California's ever growing wine industry.
Of all the New World wine countries, perhaps the one which has demonstrated the most flair for producing high quality wines - using a combination of traditional and forward-thinking contemporary methods - has been the United States of America. For the past couple of centuries, the United States has set about transforming much of its suitable land into vast vineyards, capable of supporting a wide variety of world-class grape varietals which thrive on both the Atlantic and the Pacific coastlines. Of course, we immediately think of sun-drenched California in regards to American wines, with its enormous vineyards responsible for the New World's finest examples of Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot based wines, but many other states have taken to viticulture in a big way, with impressive results. Oregon, Washington State and New York have all developed sophisticated and technologically advanced wine cultures of their own, and the output of U.S wineries is increasing each year as more and more people are converted to their produce.