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$182.94
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Avignonesi Vin Santo Di Montepulciano 2000 375ml

Rated 92 - Bright amber-yellow. Fabulous high-toned aromas of raisin, caramel, white chocolate, hazelnut, roasted apricot and honey. Wonderfully...
$53.94
$53.14
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Castello Di Ama Vin Santo Del Chianti Classico 2011 375ml

Rated 90 - A fresh, clean style of Vin Santo, this exudes peach, honey and caramel flavors, showing more walnut elements as this winds down on the...
$77.44
$76.64
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Castello Di Bossi Vin Santo Laurentino 2004 375ml

Rated 93 - The 2004 Vin Santo San Laurentino is a unique dessert wine with a fascinating rainbow of aromas that spans from canned peach to dried...
$43.94
$43.54
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Cos Aestas Sicilliae NV 375ml

Rated 92 - A little cloudy with an orange-yellow color. A dense, pretty sweet white with dried apricots, dried oranges, peaches and honey. Full...
$44.34
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Felsina Vin Santo 2005 375ml

Rated 92 - Made with Trebbiano, Malvasia and Sangiovese, the 2005 Vin Santo del Chianti Classico opens to a brilliant amber color and thick...
$54.94
$53.94
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La Roncaia Ramandolo 2011 375ml

Rated 93 - The 2011 Ramandolo (375-milliliter) is an impressive effort and a distinctive dessert wine. It shows a dark amber appearance with gold...

375ml Dessert Wine Italy

There are few countries in the world with a viticultural history as long or as illustrious as that claimed by Italy. Grapes were first being grown and cultivated on Italian soil several thousand years ago by the Greeks and the Pheonicians, who named Italy 'Oenotria' – the land of wines – so impressed were they with the climate and the suitability of the soil for wine production. Of course, it was the rise of the Roman Empire which had the most lasting influence on wine production in Italy, and their influence can still be felt today, as much of the riches of the empire came about through their enthusiasm for producing wines and exporting it to neighbouring countries. Since those times, a vast amount of Italian land has remained primarily for vine cultivation, and thousands of wineries can be found throughout the entire length and breadth of this beautiful country, drenched in Mediterranean sunshine and benefiting from the excellent fertile soils found there. Italy remains very much a 'land of wines', and one could not imagine this country, its landscape and culture, without it.