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I Favati Taurasi 'Terzotratto' 2010 750ml

size
750ml
country
Italy
region
Campania
appellation
Taurasi
subappellation
Taurasi
93
VM
Additional vintages
2010 2009
93
VM
Rated 93 by Vinous Media
In the 2010 Taurasi Terzotratto I find a dusty, floral display, as bright strawberry gives way to dried herbs, crushed stone, citrus zest, and a hint of ginger. On the palate, soft textures flood the senses with violet-floral infused black fruits and minerals, carried by zesty acids, as fine tannins slowly build toward the finale. The finish is long and structured, as tart black fruits cling to the senses, along with penetrating minerality, resonating acid tones, and lingering dark florals. There’s a lot going on in this glass of 2010 Taurasi ’Terzotratto’, with depths still unseen, even nine years post-vintage. With its balance of fruit, acids, and tannin, I’d be interested in seeing where it’s at in another ten years.

I Favati Taurasi 'Terzotratto' 2010 750ml

SKU 822432
$49.94
/750ml bottle
Quantity
1
* This item is available for online ordering only. It can be picked up or shipped from our location within 4-6 business days. ?
Professional Ratings
93
VM
93
VM
Rated 93 by Vinous Media
In the 2010 Taurasi Terzotratto I find a dusty, floral display, as bright strawberry gives way to dried herbs, crushed stone, citrus zest, and a hint of ginger. On the palate, soft textures flood the senses with violet-floral infused black fruits and minerals, carried by zesty acids, as fine tannins slowly build toward the finale. The finish is long and structured, as tart black fruits cling to the senses, along with penetrating minerality, resonating acid tones, and lingering dark florals. There’s a lot going on in this glass of 2010 Taurasi ’Terzotratto’, with depths still unseen, even nine years post-vintage. With its balance of fruit, acids, and tannin, I’d be interested in seeing where it’s at in another ten years.
Product Details
size
750ml
country
Italy
region
Campania
appellation
Taurasi
subappellation
Taurasi
Additional vintages
2010 2009
Overview
Rated 93 - In the 2010 Taurasi Terzotratto I find a dusty, floral display, as bright strawberry gives way to dried herbs, crushed stone, citrus zest, and a hint of ginger. On the palate, soft textures flood the senses with violet-floral infused black fruits and minerals, carried by zesty acids, as fine tannins slowly build toward the finale. The finish is long and structured, as tart black fruits cling to the senses, along with penetrating minerality, resonating acid tones, and lingering dark florals. There’s a lot going on in this glass of 2010 Taurasi ’Terzotratto’, with depths still unseen, even nine years post-vintage. With its balance of fruit, acids, and tannin, I’d be interested in seeing where it’s at in another ten years.
barrel.svg

Vintage: 2010

2010 saw extremely high quality viticulture in many parts of the world, with an exceptionally long and hot summer providing huge benefits for wineries across many countries, especially in the southern hemisphere. The northern hemisphere and Europe saw something of a cooler summer and flowering period, but this was by no means as disastrous as it could have been. France, especially, had a fantastic year in 2010, with the world renowned Burgundy region proclaiming that their white wines of this year are ones to look out for, and despite yields being relatively small across much of the country, the quality was exceptionally high. Spain, too, received some cooler weather, but Rioja and the rest of central Spain are hailing 2010 as a very good year indeed, again as a result of smaller, finer yields. California also received similar climatic conditions, but again, wineries are highly positive about the overall effect this had on their produce, as the slightly challenging conditions resulted in smaller yields of much elegance and distinction. 2010 was really Australia's year, and in South Australia and across the Mornington Peninsula, Chardonnay vines produced good yields with a lower sugar level than in previous years. As such, the majority of South Australian white wines from 2010 are superb, and packed full of character. Shiraz also had a great year, and most Australian wineries have been proclaiming 2010 one of the great vintages. Both the Argentinian and Chilean wine industries benefited from some ideal climatic conditions this year, and are reportedly ecstatically pleased with the fact that their 2010 wines ended up with lower alcohol levels, and were beautifully balanced wines packed full of flavor.
green-grapes.svg

Varietal: Aglianico

Aglianico varietal grapes have a long and impressive history, having been brought to the Campania region of Italy over two thousand years ago, and becoming the primary grape for the production of ancient Rome's finest wines. They were and continue to be prized for their deep dark color, and particularly their thick black skins which have a high tannin content. These tannins mean that the wine made from Aglianico grapes is ideal for aging, as time spent in oak mellows the harsher characteristics of the grape and results in fine, mellow, balanced wines bursting with complex fruit flavors Aglianico grapes also have a high acidity content, but this doesn't get in the way of the lovely plum and chocolate aromas associated with the varietal. Aglianico grapes are often blended with Bordeaux varietals, to produce wonderfully complex wines of excellent character.
barrel.svg

Region: Campania

For over three thousand years now, Campania has been one of Europe's most important and enduring wine regions. A thousand years before the Romans helped spread Italian wines around the known world, Campanian farmers and vintners were experimenting with their vast array of native grape varietals, and producing wines which went down in history due to their quality, their strength of character and their fine aromas and flavors What makes Campania so special? There are, of course, many theories. However, one only has to look at the exceptional volcanic soils, and hot, dry Mediterranean climate of the region in order to begin understanding just why the grapes here grow so well and express so many fine characteristics. This special region has been producing quality wines since time immemorial, and it seems unlikely it will stop doing so any time soon.
field.svg

Country: Italy

There are few countries in the world with a viticultural history as long or as illustrious as that claimed by Italy. Grapes were first being grown and cultivated on Italian soil several thousand years ago by the Greeks and the Pheonicians, who named Italy 'Oenotria' – the land of wines – so impressed were they with the climate and the suitability of the soil for wine production. Of course, it was the rise of the Roman Empire which had the most lasting influence on wine production in Italy, and their influence can still be felt today, as much of the riches of the empire came about through their enthusiasm for producing wines and exporting it to neighbouring countries. Since those times, a vast amount of Italian land has remained primarily for vine cultivation, and thousands of wineries can be found throughout the entire length and breadth of this beautiful country, drenched in Mediterranean sunshine and benefiting from the excellent fertile soils found there. Italy remains very much a 'land of wines', and one could not imagine this country, its landscape and culture, without it.
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More Details
Winery I Favati
barrel.svg

Vintage: 2010

2010 saw extremely high quality viticulture in many parts of the world, with an exceptionally long and hot summer providing huge benefits for wineries across many countries, especially in the southern hemisphere. The northern hemisphere and Europe saw something of a cooler summer and flowering period, but this was by no means as disastrous as it could have been. France, especially, had a fantastic year in 2010, with the world renowned Burgundy region proclaiming that their white wines of this year are ones to look out for, and despite yields being relatively small across much of the country, the quality was exceptionally high. Spain, too, received some cooler weather, but Rioja and the rest of central Spain are hailing 2010 as a very good year indeed, again as a result of smaller, finer yields. California also received similar climatic conditions, but again, wineries are highly positive about the overall effect this had on their produce, as the slightly challenging conditions resulted in smaller yields of much elegance and distinction. 2010 was really Australia's year, and in South Australia and across the Mornington Peninsula, Chardonnay vines produced good yields with a lower sugar level than in previous years. As such, the majority of South Australian white wines from 2010 are superb, and packed full of character. Shiraz also had a great year, and most Australian wineries have been proclaiming 2010 one of the great vintages. Both the Argentinian and Chilean wine industries benefited from some ideal climatic conditions this year, and are reportedly ecstatically pleased with the fact that their 2010 wines ended up with lower alcohol levels, and were beautifully balanced wines packed full of flavor.
green-grapes.svg

Varietal: Aglianico

Aglianico varietal grapes have a long and impressive history, having been brought to the Campania region of Italy over two thousand years ago, and becoming the primary grape for the production of ancient Rome's finest wines. They were and continue to be prized for their deep dark color, and particularly their thick black skins which have a high tannin content. These tannins mean that the wine made from Aglianico grapes is ideal for aging, as time spent in oak mellows the harsher characteristics of the grape and results in fine, mellow, balanced wines bursting with complex fruit flavors Aglianico grapes also have a high acidity content, but this doesn't get in the way of the lovely plum and chocolate aromas associated with the varietal. Aglianico grapes are often blended with Bordeaux varietals, to produce wonderfully complex wines of excellent character.
barrel.svg

Region: Campania

For over three thousand years now, Campania has been one of Europe's most important and enduring wine regions. A thousand years before the Romans helped spread Italian wines around the known world, Campanian farmers and vintners were experimenting with their vast array of native grape varietals, and producing wines which went down in history due to their quality, their strength of character and their fine aromas and flavors What makes Campania so special? There are, of course, many theories. However, one only has to look at the exceptional volcanic soils, and hot, dry Mediterranean climate of the region in order to begin understanding just why the grapes here grow so well and express so many fine characteristics. This special region has been producing quality wines since time immemorial, and it seems unlikely it will stop doing so any time soon.
field.svg

Country: Italy

There are few countries in the world with a viticultural history as long or as illustrious as that claimed by Italy. Grapes were first being grown and cultivated on Italian soil several thousand years ago by the Greeks and the Pheonicians, who named Italy 'Oenotria' – the land of wines – so impressed were they with the climate and the suitability of the soil for wine production. Of course, it was the rise of the Roman Empire which had the most lasting influence on wine production in Italy, and their influence can still be felt today, as much of the riches of the empire came about through their enthusiasm for producing wines and exporting it to neighbouring countries. Since those times, a vast amount of Italian land has remained primarily for vine cultivation, and thousands of wineries can be found throughout the entire length and breadth of this beautiful country, drenched in Mediterranean sunshine and benefiting from the excellent fertile soils found there. Italy remains very much a 'land of wines', and one could not imagine this country, its landscape and culture, without it.