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Massaya Gold Reserve 2010 750ml
SKU 755427

Massaya Gold Reserve Red Blend 2010

Bekaa Valley - Lebanon

Professional Wine Reviews for Massaya Gold Reserve Red Blend 2010

Rated 90 by Robert Parker
The 2010 Gold Reserve is a blend of 50% Cabernet Sauvignon, 40% Mourvedre and 10% Syrah aged in equal parts new, second-year and third-year French oak. It came in at 14.5% alcohol. As with many newly released wines, the oak is front-and-center here, but there is a lot more. With 30 minutes in the glass, and after an uninspiring beginning, this fleshes out nicely and becomes more and more interesting and sometimes impressive. It tightens noticeably, showing beautiful focus and penetration. Despite the elegance in the mid-palate, it does have a bit of a burly feel to it, largely due to the combination of oak, alcohol and some power appearing on the finish. That all seems to get better with air. Happily, as it airs, it also shows some complexity, not surprising considering that half the blend is Mourvedre or Syrah. As is always the case, it showed way better at proper drinking temperatures. This (and lots of other red wines) will work a lot better at 64 degrees Fahrenheit than 74 degrees Fahrenheit. Drink 2015-2024.
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Additional Information on Massaya Gold Reserve Red Blend 2010

Winery Massaya

Vintage: 2010

2010 saw extremely high quality viticulture in many parts of the world, with an exceptionally long and hot summer providing huge benefits for wineries across many countries, especially in the southern hemisphere. The northern hemisphere and Europe saw something of a cooler summer and flowering period, but this was by no means as disastrous as it could have been. France, especially, had a fantastic year in 2010, with the world renowned Burgundy region proclaiming that their white wines of this year are ones to look out for, and despite yields being relatively small across much of the country, the quality was exceptionally high. Spain, too, received some cooler weather, but Rioja and the rest of central Spain are hailing 2010 as a very good year indeed, again as a result of smaller, finer yields. California also received similar climatic conditions, but again, wineries are highly positive about the overall effect this had on their produce, as the slightly challenging conditions resulted in smaller yields of much elegance and distinction. 2010 was really Australia's year, and in South Australia and across the Mornington Peninsula, Chardonnay vines produced good yields with a lower sugar level than in previous years. As such, the majority of South Australian white wines from 2010 are superb, and packed full of character. Shiraz also had a great year, and most Australian wineries have been proclaiming 2010 one of the great vintages. Both the Argentinian and Chilean wine industries benefited from some ideal climatic conditions this year, and are reportedly ecstatically pleased with the fact that their 2010 wines ended up with lower alcohol levels, and were beautifully balanced wines packed full of flavor.

Country: Lebanon

Lebanon is a fascinating country when it comes to wine and viticulture, with a history which stretches back to the ancient Phoenicians and civilizations which traded in wine over five thousand years ago. Indeed, the ancient Egyptian Pharaohs were enormous fans of Lebanese wines, and there is plenty of archaeological evidence supporting the fact that Lebanon routinely exported their fine produce around the known world. Today, the number of Lebanese wineries is on the increase, as more and more demand for Lebanese wines results in a renewed vigor for viticulture across the country. Although most grape varietals currently grown there are of French origin, there is also increased interest in the indigenous produce of the country, which is prompting many vintners to begin processing older, more unique grape varietals once again.